Eothen

Eothen : Traces of Travel Brought Home from the East

3.55 (149 ratings by Goodreads)

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Description

"My favorite travel book. Sparkling, ironic, and terrific fun." -- Jan Morris Eothen ("From the East") recaptures a bold young Englishman's exploits in the Middle East during the 1830s. Alexander William Kinglake recounts his rambles through the Balkans, Turkey, Cyprus, Syria, Palestine, and Egypt in a style radically different from other travel books of his era. Rather than dwelling on art or monuments, Kinglake's captivating narrative focuses on the natives and their cities. His adventures ― populated by Bedouins, pashas, slave-traders, monks, pilgrims, and other colorfully drawn personalities ― include crossing the desolate Sinai with a four-camel caravan and a sojourn in plague-ridden Cairo. A contemporary of Gladstone at Eton and of Tennyson and Thackeray at Cambridge, Kinglake offers a frankly imperialistic worldview. "As I felt so have I written," he declares in his preface, and his forthright expressions of his thoughts and impressions range in mood from confessional, to comic, to serious, to romantic. Victorian readers were captivated by Kinglake's chatty tone and his uncompromising honesty, and two centuries later this remarkable travelogue remains funny, fresh, and original.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 240 pages
  • 125 x 203 x 10mm | 230g
  • Dover Publications Inc.
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • 0486790622
  • 9780486790626
  • 924,233

About Alexander William Kinglake

Alexander William Kinglake (1809-91) was an English travel writer and Member of Parliament. He wrote an in-depth account of the Crimean War but is best remembered for this work, an account of his 1834-35 trip to the Balkans, Turkey, Cyprus, Syria, and Palestine.show more

Back cover copy

Eothen ("From the East") recaptures a bold young Englishman's exploits in the Middle East during the 1830s. Alexander William Kinglake recounts his rambles through the Balkans, Turkey, Cyprus, Syria, Palestine, and Egypt in a style radically different from other travel books of his era. Rather than dwelling on art or monuments, Kinglake's captivating narrative focuses on the natives and their cities. His adventures―populated by Bedouins, pashas, slave-traders, monks, pilgrims, and other colorfully drawn personalities―include crossing the desolate Sinai with a four-camel caravan and a sojourn in plague-ridden Cairo. A contemporary of Gladstone at Eton and of Tennyson and Thackeray at Cambridge, Kinglake offers a frankly imperialistic worldview. "As I felt so have I written," he declares in his preface, and his forthright expressions of his thoughts and impressions range in mood from confessional, to comic, to serious, to romantic. Victorian readers were captivated by Kinglake's chatty tone and his uncompromising honesty, and two centuries later this remarkable travelogue remains funny, fresh, and original. Dover (2015) republication of the edition originally published by John Lehmann, Ltd., London, 1948. See every Dover book in print at www.doverpublications.comshow more

Rating details

149 ratings
3.55 out of 5 stars
5 23% (35)
4 31% (46)
3 29% (43)
2 11% (17)
1 5% (8)
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