Entomology in Outline; Compiled for the Use of County Horticultural Commissioners & Fruit-Growers

Entomology in Outline; Compiled for the Use of County Horticultural Commissioners & Fruit-Growers

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ...or June in our common species this class swarms forth from all the nests of the neighborhood. After a flight of some distance the wings are shed, and a king chooses some queen near him and proposes that they start a kingdom of their own. But like mortal kings and queens they can not reign unless a kingdom is found for them, and so millions of these royal pairs die because they have no subjects. But sometimes a fortunate couple is discovered by some termite workers, who at once take possession of the wanderers and provide them with food and with shelter in the shape of a large circular shallow cell. In this they are really imprisoned, but are well cared for. Soon the queen or mother begins to develop eggs, and her body grows enormously. Finally, it is nothing but a huge sac filled with eggs, looking more like a potato than anything else, and is sometimes six or seven inches long. Of course, the poor queen can not move herself in the least, and if she were not fed would soon starve; but her king remains devoted to her, and her ladies and gentlemen in waiting do their best to make her comfortable; they carry away the eggs to other chambers as soon as they are laid, then care for the eggs, and feed the little ones when they are hatched. The young termites are active, and resemble the adult in form. If a nest becomes queenless, and the workers are unable to procure a queen, there are developed in the nest wingless sexual individuals, which are termed complemental males and females. But as each complemental female lays only a few eggs, it requires several to take the place of a real queen. "All white ants are miners, and avoid the light. They build covered ways wherever they wish to go. In hot countries they are a terrible pest, as they...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 46 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 100g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236767403
  • 9781236767400