Entomological News, and Proceedings of the Entomological Section of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia Volume 8

Entomological News, and Proceedings of the Entomological Section of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia Volume 8

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1897 edition. Excerpt: ... issues a wholesale denunciation of my generic divisions of the Anthicini, he makes some statements which show unfamiliarity with the subject. For instance, the divisions which I have suggested are based upon profound structural differences in important sclerites of the pro-and mesosterna hitherto wholly unsuspected, and these divisions are, with a single exception, not at all similar to any of the feebly characterized sections founded by certain European authors upon general outline of the head and prothorax, as Dr. Hamilton would seem to wish his readers to believe; if he had studied the matter a little more thoroughly he could not have fallen into so grave a misconception. The only case that I have been able to discover with a nearly complete set of the European species before me, where any division which I have proposed proves identical with a section of the European genus, is the one before us. Hemantus had, I find, previously received two distinct names, one by Mulsant and another by Pic, but this will be touched upon more fully at another time. Respectfully yours, Thos. L: Casey. Iwasps In The Air Brakes.--It would be a remarkable thing if a little insect should be the means of compelling the Westinghouse Air-brake Company to remodel the exhaust port of their pressure-retaining valve, says the Pittsburg Post, but it appears that the necessity for such a change confronts them at present, or rather confronts the railroad companies who use the brakes. The insect that causes all the trouble is the common mud wasp--a transient inhabitant of the West and Northwest--which, like the genus tramp, appears to have a penchant for traveling. The wasp builds his mud-home on the exhaust port of the valve named, and closes the vent, causing no end of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 112 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236496760
  • 9781236496768