An Enquiry Into the Foundation and History of the Law of Nations in Europe from the Time of the Greeks and Romans to the Age of Grotius

An Enquiry Into the Foundation and History of the Law of Nations in Europe from the Time of the Greeks and Romans to the Age of Grotius

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1795 edition. Excerpt: ...all-powerful Frederick II. (k) and not a weak one, so far down as the sixteenth century, when Francis I. was loaded with opprobrium in consequence of his alliances with the Porte. On this occasion, in order to regain his character in one point, that Monarch was forced to stoop to what was the greatest stain upon it in another. He had been among the first of the age in reputation for liberality, and clemency; yet he sullied his glory by executions that were only worthy the ferocity of a bigot. (/) Even so far down as the beginning of the seventeenth century, thefe prejudices retained so much of their weight with the Protestants themselves, that Grotius thought it worth while to go at large into the question; and though he allows that, as a general position, (i) See Chap. XIII. (/) Daniel. Hist, de Fr. sol 2. 298. It may be permitted, (or rather that it is not forbidden) to make an alliance with Infidels j yet he treats of these alliances with singular caution. For example, he fays that care must be taken not to suffer the connection to be too intimate, lest it might be the means of corrupting weaker understandings; and for this purpose, if there are many Christians within an Infidel territory by virtue of an alliance, he thinks that after the example of the Israelites in Egypt, they ought to keep themselves as distinct as possible from the inhabitants. (m) Again, if the alliance is likely to prove the means of rendering them too powerful, he absolutely forbids it, without the extreme of necessity; for, fays he, there is nothing so just in itself, but must give way, if it is either directly, or indirectly hurtful to religion. He even goes on to fay, that Princes and States ought to bear in their minds upon this subject, the pious and bold address...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 116 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 222g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236589661
  • 9781236589668