The English Village Community Examined in its Relation to the Manorial and Tribal Systems and to the Common or Open Field System of Husbandry

The English Village Community Examined in its Relation to the Manorial and Tribal Systems and to the Common or Open Field System of Husbandry : An Essay in Economic History

By (author) 

List price: US$80.00

Currently unavailable

We can notify you when this item is back in stock

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

The Yorkshire-born barrister, banker and economic historian Frederic Seebohm (1833-1912) first came to attention with his work on the Reformation intellectuals Colet, Erasmus and More. In this work, first published and then reissued in 1883, Seebohm's focus is on the agrarian history of medieval England, with special reference to problems of early land tenure and the social system that developed from it. Seebohm stresses the continuity between Roman settlement and English villages, and he regards the manor, whose lands were cultivated by serfs, as the original form of landed property among the Anglo-Saxons and other Germanic peoples. He was the first British historian to provide a detailed description of the structure and economic life of the large manor, based on the unpaid labour of the serfs, and of the relations between the manor and the community. The book remains an influential treatment of the feudal system.show more

Product details

  • Electronic book text
  • CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
  • Cambridge University Press (Virtual Publishing)
  • Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 3 b/w illus. 11 maps
  • 1139094440
  • 9781139094443

Table of contents

Preface; 1. The English open-field system examined in its modern remains; 2. The English open-field system traced back to the Domesday Survey; 3. The Domesday Survey (AD 1086); 4. The open-field system traced in Saxon times; 5. Manors and serfdom under Saxon rule; 6. The tribal system (in Wales); 7. The tribal system (continued); 8. Connexion between the Roman land system and the later manorial system; 9. The German side of the continental evidence; 10. The connexion between the open-field system and serfdom of England and of the Roman provinces of Germany and Gaul; 11. Result of the evidence; Appendix; Index and glossary.show more