English Pleasure Carriages; Their Origin, History, Varieties, Materials, Construction, Defects, Improvements, and Capabilities with an Analysis of the Construction of Common Roads and Railroads, and the Public Vehicles Used on Them

English Pleasure Carriages; Their Origin, History, Varieties, Materials, Construction, Defects, Improvements, and Capabilities with an Analysis of the Construction of Common Roads and Railroads, and the Public Vehicles Used on Them

By (author) 

List price: US$19.99

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1837 edition. Excerpt: ...down one after the other with a spokeshave till the whole amalgamate neatly, forming at the double, a thickness from one inch upwards. They are then double sewed together with waxed hemp pointed with blunted needles instead of bristles, as the holes are all straight and pierced with an awl called a stabbing awl, made in the form of a spear head. In what are called the best braces, four rows of stitches are introduced, and the stitches are crowded together as many as possible in the space of an inch; which is a disadvantage, as the brace is thus nearly severed longitudinally. When the braces are finished, the hinder end of each is fastened to a small windlace called the jack, fixed to the bed of the spring, and capable of being wound up by a lever. The upper end of the brace is kept firm on the back of the spring by a shackle near the top, which clips it round. In ordinary carriages, these suspension braces, known as " Polignac braces/' are admitted in the loops' heads by taking out the suspension bolts; but in ornamented carriages they are made shorter, and between them and the loops are introduced other braces, with large buckles, for the sake of effect. From the spring heads to the centre of the body, small sewn straps called check braces hang in a low curve. They are to prevent the body from swinging too far fore and aft. From the perch to the bottom of the body, there is a strong brace on each side, called the collar brace, the object of which is to resist any tendency of the body to turn over, and break the springs by a reverse action in case of violent concussion. A very important point in the comfort and appearance of the carriage is the mode in which the body hangs. It should be so disposed between the four springs that the door...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 86 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236636104
  • 9781236636102