English Philosophers of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

English Philosophers of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1910 edition. Excerpt: ... if they have any thought at all. Phil. Answer me, Hylas. Think you the senses were bestowed upon all animals for their preservation and wellbeing in life? or were they given to men alone for this end? Hyl. I make no question but they have the same use in all other animals. Phil. If so, is it not necessary they should be enabled by them to perceive their own limbs, and those bodies which are capable of harming them? Hyl. Certainly. Phil. A mite therefore must be supposed to see his own foot, and things equal or even less than it, as bodies of some considerable dimension; though at the same time they appear to you scarce discernible, or at best as so many visible points? Hyl. I cannot deny it. Phil. And to creatures less than the mite they will seem yet larger? Hyl. They will. Phil. Insomuch that what you can hardly discern will to another extremely minute animal appear as some huge mountain? Hyl. All this I grant. Phil. Can one and the same thing be at the same time in itself of different dimensions? Hyl. That were absurd to imagine. Phil. But, from what you have laid down it follows that both the extension by you perceived, and that perceived by the mite itself, as likewise all those perceived by lesser animals, are each of them the true extension of the mite's foot; that is to say, by your own principles you are led into an absurdity. Hyl. There seems to be some difficulty in the point. Phil. Again, have you not acknowledged that no real inherent property of any object can be changed without some change in the thing itself? Hyl. I have. Phil. But, as we approach to or recede from an object, the visible extension varies, being at one distance ten or a hundred times greater than another. Doth it not therefore follow from hence likewise...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 154 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 286g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236963482
  • 9781236963482