English Grammar and Composition in Which the Science of the Language Is Made Tributary to the Art of Expression; A Course of Practical Lessons Carefully Graded, and Adapted to Every-Day Use in the School-Room

English Grammar and Composition in Which the Science of the Language Is Made Tributary to the Art of Expression; A Course of Practical Lessons Carefully Graded, and Adapted to Every-Day Use in the School-Room

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ...the words omitted from the last part of each compound. What shows that the parts of 2 are not closely connected? Would a conjunction bring them more closely together? If a conjunction is used, would you change the punctuation? A sentence that unites with another to make one greater sentence we call a clause. Read the first part of 2 and change somebody's first to a phrase and then to a clause used like an adjective. What distinction can you make between the use of the semicolon and the use of the comma in 3? The clause if he borrows is joined like an adverb to what verb? If he begs and geisf What pronoun more indefinite than your might take its place in 4? What noun? Explain the use of the semicolon and the comma in 4. Supply hat after thing and tell what clause is here used like an adjective. Find the oflice of that by placing it after do. Find in 4 an infinitive phrase used as attribute complement. Change the phrase in 1, paragraph 2, to a clause. Find in 2 the omitted predicate of the clause introduced by than. Find a compound subject in 3. Are negligence, falsehood, and mendacity, in 5, used as subjects? Explain their use and punctuation. (See Remark, Lesson 45.) In 3, paragraph 3, how are the words borrowed from Paul marked? Change the quotation from Paul so as to give his thought but not his exact words. Are the quotation marks now needed? In 3 and 4 find' clauses introduced by that, which, and who, and used like adjectives. The Grouping of Sentences into Par-agraphs.--You can easily learn the sub-topic, or thought, each of these paragraphs develops. See whether you can find it in the first sentence of each. Give the three sub-topics. Put together the three thoughts established in these paragraphs and tell what they prove....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 90 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 177g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236876296
  • 9781236876294