The English Dialect Grammar; Comprising the Dialects of England, of the Shetland and Orkney Islands, and of Those Parts of Scotland, Ireland & Wales W

The English Dialect Grammar; Comprising the Dialects of England, of the Shetland and Orkney Islands, and of Those Parts of Scotland, Ireland & Wales W

List price: US$28.10

Currently unavailable

We can notify you when this item is back in stock

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 edition. Excerpt: ... konderj condign, malen, malign, reg reign. $ 271. Final n has disappeared in kil kiln Sc. Ant. Nhb. Dur. Cum. Wm. w.Yks., Lan. also kiln, I.Ma. Chs. Stf. n.Der. Lin. Rut. Nhp. Shr. ne.Nrf. Suf. Sur. Sus. Som. eDev. The n in one has disappeared when it stands before a noun, as e or ja man, but give us jan, &c. wm. sm. em. Se s.Sc. Nhb. Dur. Cum. Wm. snw. nm. & e.Yks. nw.Lan. On the various forms of one in the dialects see E.D.D. Final unstressed n has often disappeared, especially in the south-western dialects, as aie(r) iron, op open, Sec. In Sc. n.Cy. n. & w.Midl. also s.Nrf. w.Suf. the final n bas disappeared in i in, a on, upa, upon, i,, upa, -pa were formerlyonly used before a following consonant, bat in the mod. dialects they arc gen. used before a following vowel also. In some dialects a distinction is still made between the anteconsonantal and the antevocalic use of in. iv, rarely in, is used before a following vowel in Nhb. Cum. Wm. n. ne. nw. c. nm. & sm.Ylcs. In the dialects of Eng. the n in an has gen. disappeared before a following vowel, as a apl. When n is used it is gen. attached to the noun, as a napl. ) 272. The guttural q, written n in OE., only occurred before the gutturals g and c. In stressed syllables medial qg has become rj in Sc. Irel. n.Cy. n.Midl. also se.Ken. Sus. w. & s.Som., as flqa(r finger, h-na(r, uqa(r) hunger, iqlif English, mini mingle, sirjl single, &c. In the other parts of England qg has generally remained, as flqga(r), &c. q has become n before the following dental in len length, strenp strength in Sc. Irel. n.Cy. The 11 is also very common in other parts of Eng., but beside it there exist the forms leqb, leqkh; streijp, ..."show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 185.42 x 304.8 x 7.62mm | 90.72g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236640500
  • 9781236640505