England's Topographer; Or a New and Complete History of the County of Kent; From the Earliest Records to the Present Time, Including Every Modern Improvement. Embellished with a Series of Views from Original Drawings by Geo. Shepherd, H.

England's Topographer; Or a New and Complete History of the County of Kent; From the Earliest Records to the Present Time, Including Every Modern Improvement. Embellished with a Series of Views from Original Drawings by Geo. Shepherd, H.

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1830 edition. Excerpt: ...founded by John Lucas, of Greenhithe, who, in the 19th of Edward III. obtained the king's licence to assign over a ipiece of ground, and twenty acres of pasture in this parish, to a chaplain, for the celebration of divine offices daily in the chapel, in honour of the Virgin. This was suppressed under Edward VI., and some of the walls remained; but, being converted into a tenement, no outward appearance is now apparent. At the east end is the seat of Ingress, situated close beneath the chalk cliffs, on the bank of the Thames, along which it commands a most beautiful view; the pleasure grounds are formed over the remains of an extensive range of chalk cliff, which form an inequality of soil beyond what any art or expens.e could present or attain. We understand the mansion has been pulled down. Above the London road, on the southern side, is a neat modern house, called Knockholt, built by one of the family of the Hayes's, of Cobham, the last of whom, Mr. Bonham Hayes, left it by will to Mr. Butler, of Deal, who now owns it.. Contiguous are two small hamlets, called Milton street, and Weston cross. From the above road the ground rises southward to the villagfe of Swanscombe, at the west end of which is the mansion of the manor; part having been pulled down, it is used as a farm-house; and at a short distance is the parsonage and church. Round the village are some tolerable good lands, though rather inclined to be gravelly, and also some orchards. Above the village the soil rises still higher, being covered with a large tract of woodland, the earth of which is a stiff clay. These woods impede the current of air, and occasion the fogs and noisome vapours arising from the marshes which hang among them, and, descending on the village and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 310 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 17mm | 558g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236749472
  • 9781236749475