England's Foreign Policy, Or, Grey-Whigs and Cotton-Whigs, with Lord Palmerston's Pet Belgian Constitution of Catholics and Liberals

England's Foreign Policy, Or, Grey-Whigs and Cotton-Whigs, with Lord Palmerston's Pet Belgian Constitution of Catholics and Liberals

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 edition. Excerpt: ...and they will naturally give it to those who make them the finest promises, those who flatter them the most. But in the end the veil falls from their eyes, and they will demand something more solid than the right of agreeing by their vote in the province, and in the parish, to elect you into the Chambers, a worthless right, which does not prevent their paying taxes on their property, on their consumption, and, above all, the tax on blood so heavy on the poor! They will require something more solid; and that something, is a share in the wealth which you enjoy so largely. You have established, say you, the rule of equality! But are the people more happy for it! To judge by their complaints they are much less so. This is what the new doctors repeat to them, and experience shows with what facility their ears open to these counsels. They do no more for those who have taken their cause in hand, but make most powerful weapon to tyranny. In fact, the government that exercises this sovereignty is not an abstract thing. From its essence, it should be the representative of society, and in this sense it could only act for it. In reality, it consists of a man or several men, animated by personal interests, agitated with passions, and subject to errors. But as society has invested it with sovereign power, it makes use of it to break the contract: the will of the greatest number is frequently not sufficient to break it. The sovereign, armed with the powers entrusted to him, can for a long time keep society idle, and nearly mute. Thus the doctrine of the sovereignty of the people only causes a neglect of precautions against power, and it is therefore pernicious to liberty." (On the French Literature of the 18th Century.) themselves masters of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 54 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 113g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123660329X
  • 9781236603296