England in 1835; A Series of Letters Written to Friends in Germany During a Residence in London and Excursions Into the Provinces Volume 2

England in 1835; A Series of Letters Written to Friends in Germany During a Residence in London and Excursions Into the Provinces Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1836 edition. Excerpt: ...but it must be observed, that this does not happen unless he cultivates the estate himself, or unless his tenant, after the expiration of his lease, agrees to pay a higher rent. He, on the other hand, who buys land after the establishment of the monopoly price, and pays dear for it in consideration of this increase, derives no advantage whatever from that price. Lastly, the income of a proprietor may increase when the competition of tenants leads to extravagant offers. That this is of no advantage in the long run, but, on the contrary, leads to the most disastrous consequences, Ireland affords but too convincing a proof. The real advantage of the landlord goes hand in hand with that of the tenant: it is absurd to separate and oppose what ought to be united. Increasing prices while the expenditure remains the same, says Mr. Jones, increase the rent of the proprietor. This is true; but only with the above-mentioned limitations, and so far as the increased prices are not caused by a diminution of the produce, or by scarcity. For this state of things does not increase the income either of the tenant or the landlord: nay, the income may increase with declining prices--that is, if the quantity of produce (the expense of raising it being the same) increased in a greater proportion than the prices declined. It is an error to attempt to account for the rise or fall of rent on one ground, without attending to the variety of circumstances which influence it. Among these I reckon, favourable or unfavourable seasons--increased facility and rapidity of communication with distant countries--increase and decrease of the population--of wages--of the rate of interest--of taxes--of the circulation of money, &c. The English system of leases by no means affords a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 74 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 150g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236523156
  • 9781236523150