The Engineer in War; With Special Reference to the Training of the Engineer to Meet the Military Obligations of Citizenship

The Engineer in War; With Special Reference to the Training of the Engineer to Meet the Military Obligations of Citizenship

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1916 edition. Excerpt: ...it may force the defenders to keep their heads down below the parapet and prevent reinforcements from coming up, and this will diminish the volume and accuracy of their fire and may permit the attacking infantry to advance against the trenches. To further decrease the vulnerability of the defenders the parapet may be provided with head cover by placing in the parapet loopholes of plank, sand bags, etc. (Figs. 32 and 33). This allows the occupants to deliver fire without exposing their heads and shoulders above the crest of the parapet. Overhead cover, con Fig. 33.--Rifle trench with plank loopholes and shelters under parapet. The latter is being covered with sod for concealment. sisting of a shelf of plank covered with earth or steel plates supported by framework may also be provided. As this requires considerable time and labor to construct and greatly increases the visibility of the parapet as a target it is of limited applicao tion (Figs. 34 and 35). The troops in the present European war are provided with steel helmets stout enough to deflect rifle bullets and shrapnel fragments. Trenches are often provided with overhead nets to stop grenades. The trenches are made very narrow with steep side slopes in order to reduce the possibility of shrapnel falling in the trench. If the earth will not stand naturally'on a steep slope some form Fig. 35.--Rifle trench with overhead cover of steel plates supported on frame-work. of revetment must be provided. The most common forms are planks or hurdles of woven brush, sand bags, fascines, and the like (Figs. 36 and 37). Drainage must also be provided if the trenches are to be occupied during rainy weather. If the trench can be properly graded a continuous drain may be carried along the back of the trench...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 48 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 104g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236496620
  • 9781236496621