The Engineer and Machinist's Assistant; A Series of Plans, Sections, and Elevations of Stationary, Marine, and Locomotive Engines, Water Wheels, Spinn

The Engineer and Machinist's Assistant; A Series of Plans, Sections, and Elevations of Stationary, Marine, and Locomotive Engines, Water Wheels, Spinn

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1854 edition. Excerpt: ...of hydraulic machine known as Ba.rker's Mill, and may be considered a type of those machines which derive their power from the reaction of fluids. WVater being let in to fill the vertical cylinder, it will flow into the horizontal tubes and issue by the lateral orifices; but in thus finding vent into the atmosphere through the (contrary) sides of the tubes, these will be made to recede in a direction opposite to that in which the water flows out, and thereby produce a circular motion of the apparatus round the axis by which it is confined. To arrive at a general notion of the power developed by the revolution of the machine, let us denote the depth of the cylinder above the level of the orifices by H, and the sum of the cross sectional areas of the jets by S; if the cylinder be kept constantly full of water to the depth H, then the weight which must be applied in an opposite direction to that in which the machine tends to revolve, and at the same distance from the axis of revolution as the centres of the orifices, to prevent the machine from getting into niotion, will be 62% S X 2H lbs., this being the hydraulic pressure due to the quan tity of water S H cubic feet discharged each second. Otherwise expressed: the weight necessary and sulficient to balance the hydraulic pressure, and thereby to prevent the machine from revolving, is that of a column of water equal in length to twice the head, and having an area of base equal to the sum of the cross sectional areas of the two jets. This is found to agree with experiment, and it may be determined from a priori reasoning. In every body falling freely, the velocity acquired in a given unit of time is such as would carry it through double the space which it has fallen during the next equal..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 318 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 17mm | 572g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236840496
  • 9781236840493