Energy in Nature; Being, with Some Additions, the Substance of a Course of Six Lectures Upon the Forces of Nature and Their Mutual Relations. Delivered Under the Auspices of the Gilchrist Educational Trust

Energy in Nature; Being, with Some Additions, the Substance of a Course of Six Lectures Upon the Forces of Nature and Their Mutual Relations. Delivered Under the Auspices of the Gilchrist Educational Trust

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1883 edition. Excerpt: ... base whose radius is equal to its own height, so that a rod 50 feet high will protect a circle on the ground round it whose diameter is 100 feet. Electrical energy may be developed in many other ways than by friction; a violent blow, and even steady pressure, produces opposite electrical states on the two opposing surfaces--the tearing of paper or linen, the crushing of sugar, the cleaving of a sheet of mica, all produce it. Many bodies in passing from the liquid to the solid state become electrical, the phenomena of combustion and evaporation are attended by it, and in the evaporation of water over the surface of the oceans is seen one source of atmospheric electricity. Certain crystals e.g., tourmaline) when heated are found to develop opposite electrical charges at opposite poles. Many animals (notably the electric eel), and some plants, produce electrification, and Volta showed that the mere contact of certain metals caused them to assume opposite electrical states. Hence, as has been pointed out by Fleeming Jenkin, "a sense enabling us to perceive electricity would frequently disclose a scene as varied as a gorgeous sunset... Every movement of our body, each touch of our hand, and the very friction of our clothes would cause a play of effects analogous to those of light and shadow on the eye.... Without eyes we might never have discovered the existence of light. By direct perception we have become aware of the vast importance of light, and it is probably owing to the absence of direct perception that we do not yet know the part which electricity plays in the economy of nature." Thus far we have been considering chiefly the production of opposite electrical states in bodies, of static electricity, i.e., of electricity at rest; the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 42 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236561538
  • 9781236561534