The Encyclopedia of Practical Horticulture; A Reference System of Commercial Horticulture, Covering the Practical and Scientific Phases of Horticulture, with Special Reference to Fruits and Vegetables Volume 4

The Encyclopedia of Practical Horticulture; A Reference System of Commercial Horticulture, Covering the Practical and Scientific Phases of Horticulture, with Special Reference to Fruits and Vegetables Volume 4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914 edition. Excerpt: ...also in the first water in which they are boiled. The scalded and drained beans should be put back in the stewpan and covered generously with boiling water. Add one tablespoonful of salt for one quart of beans. They should now cook slowly, with the cover partially off the stewpan until they have reached the required degree of tenderness. For stewed and baked beans the cooking must stop when the skins begin to crack. For beans served with a sauce they should cook until perfectly tender, but they must not be broken or mushy. For puree and soups they should be cooked until very soft. Puree of Dried Beans Cook one quart of beans in water until very soft, then drain well (saving the water) and rub through a puree sieve. Put one pint of the strained beans in a stewpan with two tablespoonfuls of butter or savory drippings, one teaspoonful of sugar, one teaspoonful of salt, onefourth of a teaspoonful of pepper, and hot milk enough to make the puree like thick mush. About half a pint of milk will be right. Cook in the double boiler for one hour, stirring often and adding more milk if too dry. Heap the puree in the center of a hot platter. Garnish with a circle of fried sausages, pork chops, mutton chops, or any fat meat. The puree may be served as a vegetable, with any kind of meat. A soup may be made with the water in which the beans were cooked and the remainder of the strained beans. Dried Beans Saute Cook the beans until tender, but not broken. Drain off the water and save it for soup. For one quart of beans put three tablespoonfuls of savory drippings or butter in a large-bottomed stewpan. When the fat is hot put in the drained beans, which have been seasoned with a tablespoonful of salt and half a teaspoonful of pepper. Cook over a hot fire for...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 280 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 15mm | 503g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236499662
  • 9781236499660