Encyclopedia of Ocean Sciences

Encyclopedia of Ocean Sciences

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Description

The Encyclopedia of Ocean Sciences is the most current, authoritative, and comprehensive resource on the science of the oceans. This ambitious work includes contributions from leading scientists around the world on the physical processes that drive the oceans and the chemical, biological, and geological disciplines. The Encyclopedia also covers ancillary topics such as ocean technology, law of the oceans, global programs, marine policy, the use of the oceans for food and energy, and the impact of pollution and climate changes. The many different methods used to study the oceans are covered, from ship-based systems to satellite remote sensing.

Users will enjoy easy access to more than 400 articles, each approximately 3000-4000 words in length with further reading lists and extensive cross referencing. Each article provides comprehensive coverage of a particular topic, and is designed for a wide audience of students, academics, researchers, and professionals. The articles are written at a level that allows undergraduate students to understand the material, while providing active researchers with the latest technical information.

Also available online on ScienceDirect. For online version information, please visit http://www.info.sciencedirect.com/reference_works
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Product details

  • Hardback | 3399 pages
  • 272 x 294 x 240mm | 13,217.61g
  • Academic Press Inc
  • San Diego, United States
  • English
  • illustrations (some colour) maps (some colour)
  • 012227430X
  • 9780122274305

Review quote

"... Superb job of building a hierarchical system of cross-referencing. ... a good addition to any university library, and should certainly be part of the holdings of graduate institutions in the marine science community." --OCEANOGRAPHY

"... Comprehensive, up-to-date, well illustrated, and well written. ... If you are studying oceanography, or teaching it, do gain access to this set of volumes. You will come to treasure it as a great source of information. ... The main task of the editors, of course, is to define the range of the encyclopedic treatment and the level of the writing, and to find the best possible scientists for producing the entries. These tasks were pursued with resounding success. ... Again, thanks to the editors of Encyclopedia of Ocean Sciences for pulling this through, and congratulations on producing an outstanding reference work." --EOS, Tranactions, American Geophysical Union

"Destined to become a classic in oceanographic studies, this work achieves its intention to be the most comprehensive, current work in its field. The signed articles, by leading experts in the field, are extensive, well written, and highly informative. Topics covered range from the study of atmospheric input of pollution to the effects of waves on beaches. Many of the articles will not be found in briefer general encyclopedias on this topic. Entries are well indexed and cross-referenced; many list additional citations for further reading. The volumes are well illustrated with graphs, charts, formulas, drawings, and pictures. This will be an extremely useful reference tool for students, educators, or researchers looking for information in oceanographic studies. Highly recommended for all libraries." --CHOICE

"...A tremendous work of 6 volumes covering a broad range of topics directly and indirectly related to ocean sciences." --E-STREAMS

Named by Library Journal as a "2001 Best Reference Source."

"This work is, by any measure, the definitive encyclopedia of all the marine sciences. It is edited by international experts, and the dozens of contributors are among the world's best in their fields. ...A good investment for any library with a strong science collection." --AMERICAN REFERENCE BOOKS
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About Karl K. Turekian

KARL KAREKIN TUREKIAN (1927-2013)

Karl Turekian was a man of remarkable scientific breadth, with innumerable important contributions to marine geochemistry, atmospheric chemistry, cosmochemistry, and global geochemical cycles. He was mentor to a long list of students, postdocs, and faculty (at Yale and elsewhere), a leader in geochemistry, a prolific author and editor, and had a profound influence in shaping his department at Yale University.

In 1949 Karl joined a graduate program in the new field of geochemistry at Columbia University under Larry Kulp with students Dick Holland and his fellow Wheaton alums Wally Broecker and Paul Gast. This was a propitious time as Columbia's Lamont Geological Observatory had only been established a few years beforehand. It was during these years that Karl began to acquire the skills that led to his rapid emergence as a leader in geochemistry.

After a brief postdoc at Columbia, Karl accepted a position as Assistant Professor of Geology at Yale University in 1956, where he set out to create a program in geochemistry from scratch. Karl spent the rest of his life on the Yale faculty and was immersed in geochemistry to the end. He was deeply involved in editing this edition of the massive Treatise on Geochemistry, which has grown to 15 volumes, until only a month before his passing away on 15 March 2013.

Karl turned to the study of deep-sea cores and especially the analysis of trace elements to study the wide variety of geochemical processes that are recorded there. His work with Hans Wedepohl in writing and tabulating the Handbook of Geochemistry (Turekian, 1969) was a major accomplishment and this work was utilized by many generations of geochemists. Teaming up with his graduate students and in association with Paul Gast, he developed a mass spectrometry lab at Yale and began to thoroughly investigate the Rb-Sr isotopic systematics of deep-sea clays, not only as repositories but also as sites for exchange to occur and serve as a control of the geochemistry of ocean water.

Karl was a major player in a revolutionary marine geochemistry campaign known as the Geochemical Ocean Section Study (GEOSECS). GEOSECS was part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration in the 1970s, and it took aim at measuring and understanding the distribution of geochemical tracers for circulation and biogeochemistry in the world's oceans.. It was also within this same time period that another large-scale `geochemical' sampling program known as Apollo 11 came along. Here Karl utilized his INAA techniques to examine some of the first returned lunar samples for their trace elements. Karl was particularly proud of being the holder of the Silliman Chair and being curator of the Yale meteorite collection. In a continuation of Karl's foray into cosmochemistry, Andy Davis came to Yale to study with Karl and Sydney Clark.

Equally important to the legacy of what Karl did for science in his research contributions on and across the planet was his influence on scientists. His legendary daily coffee hours were a training ground for many generations of students, postdocs, and visitors, as well as a proving ground for Karl's own ideas. He had a great love for vigorous scientific debate. Karl loved to question and be questioned. Nothing was sacred and, in the act of questioning as in exploring, new science arises. He was extraordinarily supportive of people, always had time to discuss and listen, and helped everyone from students to his fellow faculty at Yale. Karl was twice department chair and even when not chair, a steadying influence in times of departmental difficulty.

Andrew M. Davis, Lawrence Grossman and Albert S. Colman

University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA

Mark H. Thiemens

University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA

This Obituary was first published in PNAS, Vol. 110, No. 41, 16290-16291, 10th October 2013 (c) 2013

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States and is reproduced with permission.
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