The Encyclopaedic Dictionary; A New Original Work of Reference to All the Words in the English Language, with a Full Account of Their Origin, Meaning, Pronunciation, and Use

The Encyclopaedic Dictionary; A New Original Work of Reference to All the Words in the English Language, with a Full Account of Their Origin, Meaning, Pronunciation, and Use

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1887 edition. Excerpt: ...is sbtt eight, and in some cases twelve, there being two, four, or six driving-wheels oonpled together. The engine can be controlled, -!: I i 'j, and reversed by a link arrangement (invented by Stephensmi), which acts on the slide-valves. The weight of a locomotive is not unfrequently more than sixty tons, and the speed attained is more than seventy miles an hour on a slight down incline. The work which an engine can do is usually estimated in horse-power (q.v.), but the value of this unit varies. The nominal or low-pressure horse-power of marine engines is not 33.000 foot pounds, as on land, but more than 44,000 foot pounds, and in America its value is still greater. The efficiency of an engine is generally determined by an apparatus, in which the pressure of the steam and the motion of the engine are made to trace a curve on iaj-r by a suitable arrangement of mechanism. indicator, II., 3. steam exhaust-port, 5, exhaust POKT. team fire-engine, . fire-engine, 1. steam-fountain, . A jet or body of water raised by the pressure of steam upon the surface of the water in a reservoir. steam steam-gas, s. superheated Steam (q.v.). Steam-gauge, 5. An instrument attached to a boiler to indicate the pressure of steam. There are many varieties. The oldest ami simplest consists of a bent tube partially lilled with mercury, one end of which springs from the boiler, so that the steam rising in the tube forces up the mercury in proportion to the amount of pressure. Bourdon's consists of an elliptical copper tube bent into an arc of 540. One of the extremities communicates with the boiler or reservoir of condensed gas whose pressure is to be measured, and the other carries an index which moves backward or forward on a graduated arc as the curvature of the tube...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 442 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 23mm | 785g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236549643
  • 9781236549648