The Encyclopaedia of Municipal and Sanitary Engineering; A Handy Working Guide in All Matters Connected with Municipal and Sanitary Engineering and Administration

The Encyclopaedia of Municipal and Sanitary Engineering; A Handy Working Guide in All Matters Connected with Municipal and Sanitary Engineering and Administration

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1910 edition. Excerpt: ...generally contains several millions. These may be divided into two classes, the aerobic and anaerobic; the former growing freely only in the presence of an abundance of air, and the latter only thriving where air is excluded. The essential constituent of the atmosphere which accelerates or retards the growth of these bacteria is the oxygen; and as the real purifying organisms are aerobic, the necessity for a free supply of air during certain processes of sewage purification is rendered evident. Whilst in the sewers the aerobic bacteria have commenced the work of decomposition, and the urea found in urine and tho 291 u 2 more readily decomposible nitrogenous matter found in excretal matter have been broken down with the production of much carbonic acid and ammonia. The Micrococcus urea is probably the most important organism producing this change. If now the sewage is confined in a closed tank, or the access of air is in any way prevented, the anaerobic bacteria become active, and acting upon the more insoluble portions decompose them with the production of gaseous and other bodies which are more or less soluble. The destruction of cellulose, the chief constituent of the woody fibre from which paper is made, is chiefly effected under anaerobic conditions by the Bacillus amylobacter. If the sewage is too long confined putrefaction sets in, with the production of a relatively large proportion of sulphuretted hydrogen and other offensive products, the presence of which not only causes a nuisance, but actually impedes the action of the aerobic bacteria at a later stage of the process of purification. Confinement in a closed tank, therefore, should be sufficiently long to liquefy the maximum amount of insoluble organic matter without allowing the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 308 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 16mm | 553g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236653432
  • 9781236653437