An Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry and Its Kindred Sciences; Comprising the Whole Range of Arts, Sciences and Literature as Connected with the Institution

An Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry and Its Kindred Sciences; Comprising the Whole Range of Arts, Sciences and Literature as Connected with the Institution

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1874 edition. Excerpt: ...louveteau also means a young wolf, and that in the Egyptian mysteries of Isis the candidate was made to wear the mask of a wolfs head. I fence, a wolf and a candidate in these mysteries were often used as synonymous terms. Macrobius, in his Saturnalia, says, in reference to this custom, that the ancients perceived a relationship between the sun, the great symbol in these mysteries, and a wolf, which the candidate represented at his initiation. For, he remarks, as the flocks of sheep and cattle fly and disperse at the sight of the wolf, so the flocks of stars disappear at the approach of the sun's light. The learned reader will also recollect that in the Greek language lukot signifies both the sun and a wolf. Hence some etymologists have sought to derive louveteau, the son of a Mason, from louveteau, a young wolf. But I prefer the more direct derivation from louve, the operative instrument. Im Browne's Matter Key, which is supposed to represent the Prestonian lecture, we find the following definition: "What do we call the son of a Freemason? "A lewis. "What does that denote? "Strength. "How is a lewis depicted in a Mason's Lodge? "As a cramp of metal, by which, when fixed into a stone, great and ponderous weights are raised to a certain height and fixed upon their proper basis, without which Operative Masons could not so conveniently do. "What is the duty of a lewis, the son of a Mason, to his aged parents? "To bear the heavy burden in the heat of the day and help them in time of need, which, by reason of their great age, they ought to be exempted from, so as to render the close of their days happy and comfortable. "His privilege for so doing? "To be made a Mason before any other person, however...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 804 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 41mm | 1,406g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236511735
  • 9781236511737