The Encyclopaedia and Dictionary of Education; A Comprehensive, Practical and Authoritative Guide on All Matters Connected with Education, Including Educational Principles and Practice, Various Types of Teaching Institutions, Volume N . 2

The Encyclopaedia and Dictionary of Education; A Comprehensive, Practical and Authoritative Guide on All Matters Connected with Education, Including Educational Principles and Practice, Various Types of Teaching Institutions, Volume N . 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1921 edition. Excerpt: ...considerable inducement is offered, and the struggle to resist more positive temptation is often very severe. When, however, the disinclination or temptation has once been overcome, the effort needed on subsequent occasions is less intense, and becomes still easier with repetition. These more deep-seated actions thus resemble simple ones in becoming easier with habit, for the reason that both mind and body are accustomed to them, and the initial effort to " make up one's mind " to them is no longer needed. Similarly, bad habits become more nearly automatic with frequent repetition, and to overcome them becomes correspondingly more difficult. A confirmed habit thus comes to resemble an instinct, in being an action performed almost automatically in response to a definite stimulus. Instinct has been described as " inherited habit "; and without entering on the vexed question of the evolution of instinct, we may agree that a confirmed habit closely resembles an instinct in its action. It will thus be seen how fundamentally important is habit in all departments of life: for good or useful habits involve enormous economy of effort, while a bad habit causes perpetual strain in the attempt to eradicate it. While it is important to avoid allowing a child to grow up a mere creature of habit, it must be remembered that acting by reason rather than by mere custom may itself become habitual; and while the importance of developing right habits in all directions can hardly be overestimate'd, the most important habit of all is that of acting according to reason and not simply mechanically. L. Doncaster. Reference--Sherrington, C. S. The Integrative Action of the Nervous System. HAILEYBURY COLLEGE.--The main buildings of Haileybury, situated...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 566 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 29mm | 998g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236600193
  • 9781236600196