The Encyclopaedia Britannica; A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and General Literature, with New Maps and Original American Articles by Eminent Writers Volume 13

The Encyclopaedia Britannica; A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and General Literature, with New Maps and Original American Articles by Eminent Writers Volume 13

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ...when the schism was nominally terminated in 1415 by the council of Constance, the next two popes held but a precarious grasp upon their Italian domains. Martin V. (1417-1431) resided principally at Florence. Eugenius IV. (1431-1447) followed his example. And what Martin managed to regain Eugenius lost. At the same time, the change which had now come over Italian politics, the desire on all sides for a settlement, and the growing conviction that a federation was necessary, proved advantageous to the popes as sovereigns. They gradually entered into the spirit of their age, assumed the style of despots, and made use of the human istic movement, then at its height, to place themselves in a new relation to Italy. The election of Nicholas V. in 1447 determined this revolution in the papacy, and opened a period of temporal splendour, which ended with the establishment of the popes as sovereigns. Thomas of Sarzana was a distinguished humanist. Humbly born, he had been tutor in the house of the Albizzi, and afterwards librarian of the Medici at Florence, where he imbibed the politics together with the culture of the Renaissance. Soon after assuming the tiara, he found himself without a rival in thechurch; for the schism ended by Felix V.'s resignation in 1449. Nicholas fixed his residence in Rome, which hebegan to rebuild and to fortify, determining to render the Eternal City once more a capital worthy of its high place in Europe. The Romans were flattered; and, though his reign was disturbed by republican conspiracy, Nicholas V. was able before his death in 1455 to secure the modern status of the pontifl' as a splendid patron and a wealthy temporal potentate. Italy was now for a brief space independent. The Cvnfed humanistic movement...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 54mm | 1,910g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236823486
  • 9781236823489