To Encourage the Mining of Coal, Oil, Gas, Etc., on the Public Domain; Hearing Before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Public Lands, United States Senate, Sixty-Third Congress, Second Session, on S. 4898, a Bill to Encourage and Promote

To Encourage the Mining of Coal, Oil, Gas, Etc., on the Public Domain; Hearing Before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Public Lands, United States Senate, Sixty-Third Congress, Second Session, on S. 4898, a Bill to Encourage and Promote

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914 edition. Excerpt: ...by the bona fide prospector, by a well drilled, or until the work is abandoned. The CHAIRMAN. Of course, there are various views as to the benefits to be derived from it. We have one benefit which the Government anticipates, as I understand it, and that is to in some way facilitate the control of monopolies. I do not see at the present time how it can do it. Another thing is to give a lot of work to a great many people. That may help to a certain extent. Another Is to prevent monopoly of the oil business. This bill will help to that extent. And in addition to that, to increase the amount of wealth to the country, or thediseovery of present natural resources. Mr. GRAHAM. Yes. The CHAIRMAN. Now, taking into consideration the situation in Nevada, my State, we have no oil that we know of, no oil-bearing strata, no oil-bearing sands. There are certain large areas there that the experts have said gave good indications of bearmg oil. Now, the Government is not i' tegcsteil in whether it is A, B, C, or D that makes that discovery. Mr. GRAHAM. Not at all. The CHAIRMAN. And to cover the territOry there of 20 miles long and 10 miles wide it would possibly take or 10 or 20 wells to determine as to whether or not the expert opinion of tho-;e geologists is correct in that matter. So what is the objection to having l', l).(1.'.(. 10 or 15 wells started at the same time, rather than just 5 or 6 of them? Mr. GRAHAM. There would be an objection even if you could have them all started at the same time, because if it took 8 or 10 wells to determine that, it would be fair to assume that before half that number had been drilled, if 1 well had been drilled at a time, the matter would be determined. In other words, you would have a much larger number...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 34 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236811089
  • 9781236811080