Embroidery and Lace; Their Manufacture and History from the Remotest Antiquity to the Present Day. a Handbook for Amateurs, Collectors, and General Re

Embroidery and Lace; Their Manufacture and History from the Remotest Antiquity to the Present Day. a Handbook for Amateurs, Collectors, and General Re

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1888 edition. Excerpt: ...of these embroideries is placed at more than three hundred thousand livres. Princely nuptials were also occasions for the giving of important orders for embroideries (fig. 70). La Fage, Jean Perreux, and Trumeau are cited as having been engaged by the Duc de Choiseul to embroider satin fittings and linings of superb coaches used in the wedding cortege of the Grand Dauphin when he married Marie-Joseph of Saxony. Monsieur de Montgomery contributed to the exhibition of the Union Centrale des Arts Decoratifs held in 1882 a bed and arm-chair worked in feather stitch, which had belonged to Queen Marie-Leczinska. The canopy and head of the bed are decorated with medallions, containing subjects such as Psyche rising and looking at Cupid. Upon the coverlet are Cupid, Jupiter, and Mercury. A very marked impulse was given to the Lyons silk manufactories in the eighteenth century, and to embroideries made in that town. The designers for them displayed high skill in their compositions; particularly two, Bony an inhabitant, previously at Gisors, and Philippe de la Salle, both of whom left behind them a great reputation." Linen was of a most exquisite quality, consonant with this age of frivolity. Inimitable skill was shown in embroidering delicate cambrics, with which coquettish duchesses, equally punctilious in their dishabille as in their grandes toilettes, would envelop themselves. The needle-workers of Saxony were conspicuous for the excellence of their drawn thread and all sorts of white embroideries; and the Queen and the Dauphin set a fashion for these as well as for porcelain wares from Saxony. The rococo style, which had its vogue in the reign of Louis XV., was based upon the employment of forms like conch and other shells nestling amongst frizzy...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 68 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236521056
  • 9781236521057