The Elements of Sailmaking; Being a Complete Treatise on Cutting-Out Sails, According to the Most Appproved Methods in the Merchant Service

The Elements of Sailmaking; Being a Complete Treatise on Cutting-Out Sails, According to the Most Appproved Methods in the Merchant Service

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1847 edition. Excerpt: ...the sail, to protect the bolt rope from being chafed in the way of the guy for steadying the boom. Cringles with iron thimbles are stuck in the clues, the earings being served, as well as the cringle, in the centre of the head. MAIN-TOPMAST-STUDDINGSAIL (PLATE 7). 124. This sail is made of No. 4 or 5 canvass, and spreads beyond the leeches of the main-topsail, the head being bent to its yard. The inner-. earing covers two cloths of the topsail, and the foot, extended on the boom, covers one cloth of the topsail-clue. To find the size, refer to Rule on page 26, and gores at page 45. A reef-band, 6 inches broad, is put on at 5 feet down from the head: pieces on the four corners. Two holes are made at the clue, for the cringle; and two holes for the downhauls on the outer leech, at onethird the depth of the leech from the head of the upper one, and the other half-way between it and the tack. The head-holes are cut one and two in each cloth respectively. In sewing on the bolt-rope, a regular slack should be taken up in the foot and goring-leech, and none in the square-leech. The tack is served and marled for 18 inches each way. One reef-cringle is made on the leeches at each end of the reef-band, and one at the clue. The earings are served, and the cringles have iron thimbles knocked in. FORE TOPMAST STUDDINGSAIL (PLATE 7). 125. This sail is made of No. 4 or 5 canvass, and spreads beyond the leeches of the fore-topsail, the head being bent to its yard. The inner-earing covers two cloths of the topsail, and the foot is extended on the boom to cover one cloth of the topsail-clue. To find the size, refer to Rule at page 26, and gores at page 45. It is finished precisely in the same way as the preceding. Some ships have mizen-topmast-studdingsails, but...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 44 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236503694
  • 9781236503695