Elements of Physics, Or, Natural Philosophy, General and Medical; Explained Independently of Technical Mathematics, and Containing New Disquisitions and Practical Suggestions, in Two Volumes Volume . 1

Elements of Physics, Or, Natural Philosophy, General and Medical; Explained Independently of Technical Mathematics, and Containing New Disquisitions and Practical Suggestions, in Two Volumes Volume . 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1831 edition. Excerpt: ... in the tube d, the fifteen pounds of oil were lifted out of it, water would rise into it until enough had entered to reproduce the pressure of fifteen pounds on the surface below as before; that is to say, the water would rise thirty-four feet, as in the external tube w i. This internal tube and piston again would form a pump.--In like manner, when a tube open at both ends is plunged from the air into water, the air presses on the surface of the water within the tube, as on the surface around it, with a force of fifteen pounds to the inch, and the two surfaces are not affected by the equal pressures; but if, by a piston, we lift the air out of the tube, as we suppose the oil lifted in the last experiment, the water will then rise thirty-four feet, foU lowing the piston. This arrangement of parts is the most usual for the lifting or household pump. 5th. If a common bottle or a vessel of any other shape, as the bent tube e, were filled with water, and plunged under the oil until its mouth or mouths reached below the water-surface at the level W, it would remain full of water, owing to the pressure of the oil surrounding it. For a similar reason, any such vessel or tube, surrounded only by the air, when filled with water, and placed with its mouth or mouths under the surface of water, remains full; and if one end of the tube be longer than the other, a current is established in it;--the contrivance being then called a syphon. 6th. A fish in the water below the level W, would be bearing the pressure of the oil from O to W, as well as the pressure of the water.--So a fish in water open to the air, is open to the atmospheric pressure of fifteen pounds per inch, in addition to that of the water itself. This is proved by extracting the air from over...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 182 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 336g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236544617
  • 9781236544612