Elements of Mythology; Or, Classical Fables of the Greeks and Romans to Which Are Added Some Notices of Syrian, Hindu, and Scandinavian Superstitions, Together with Those of the American Nations the Whole Comparing Polytheism with True

Elements of Mythology; Or, Classical Fables of the Greeks and Romans to Which Are Added Some Notices of Syrian, Hindu, and Scandinavian Superstitions, Together with Those of the American Nations the Whole Comparing Polytheism with True

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 18 edition. Excerpt: ...years. After this horrid act, however cruel the provocation, Orestes was tormented by the Furies, and could not be happy anywhere. To be tormented by t/tt Furies, means that he was sorry for what he had done; that he thought constantly of his murdered mother, and hated himself for his crime. Euripides, one of the Greek poets, says, that Orestes consulted the oracle of Apollo, to learn how he must make amends for his crime, and to escape from the vengeance of the Furies. The oracle commanded him, in order to recover the peace of his mind, to go to Taurica Chersone-sus, and bring from thence the statue of Diana. This was a difficult undertaking, for the King of Chersonesus always sacrificed every stranger who entered his dominions. ButOrestes was not intimidated, and, accompanied by his friend Pylades, set out for the dominions of the barbarian king. When the two friends arrived at Tauros, they were carried before Thoas the king, and he commanded them to be sacrificed to Diana. Iphigenia was the priestess, and assisted at all the sacrifices of the goddess. As soon as Iphigenia learned that the victims she was appointed to offer were Greeks, she thought of her far ofT country, and longed to see the strangers, and to converse with them. Iphigenia was touched with pity at the sight of Pylades and Orestes, and she resolved to spare the life of one of them, though she could not so far disobey the king as to save both. She told them as she was a Greek, that she had frifinds in Greece, ana Chersonesus is from the Greek, and signifies a peninsula, f The Greeks called all nations who were not Greeks, txo tariant. ORESTES AND PYLADES. IGt that one or other of them should be permitted o re' turn to their country, if he would lake letters from her to her...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 64 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 132g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236669738
  • 9781236669735