Elements of Military Art and History; Comprising the History and Tactics of the Separate Arms the Combination of the Arms and the Minor Operations of War

Elements of Military Art and History; Comprising the History and Tactics of the Separate Arms the Combination of the Arms and the Minor Operations of War

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1863 edition. Excerpt: ...manoeuvres and fights by brigades. Besides, when the outpost service is filled from a number of combined brigades, the general commanding the division still has it in his power to modify it, and point out to the brigades the best posts to occupy to maintain their mutual connection and protect their flanks. As far as possible, the infantry grand guards, which serve for support, will be combined with the cavalry grand guards, which perform the duty of advanced sentinels. If it can be done, it will be useful to attach to the infantry grand guards a certain number of horsemen, whose duty it will be to obtain prompt intelligence respecting the enemy. The grand guard of a regiment, or even of a bat Pr6val, Commentaires sur le service en campagne, p. 73. talion, whether infantry or cavalry, is commanded by a captain. Its force depends upon its object and the means at disposal, and also upon the rule that it requires four men for one sentinel; but subsequent data may modify this force. The grand guards are placed at the outlets whose defence is of the highest importance, else in a'com-manding and covered position in the centre of the region to be observed. To place them with a wood in their rear would be exposing them to destruction. Their position may be changed at the close of the day. Upon hilly ground, and especially in the midst of a hostile population, it is prudent to keep them near to the army. Even upon level ground, if they are placed at a great distance, it will be proper to establish intermediate posts. The grand guards are seldom dispensed with, and never without orders from the general. But the ordinance authorizes those who are exposed upon a plain to attacks of cavalry, to erect barricades, dig a circular ditch, or cover themselves by an...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 106 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 204g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236599489
  • 9781236599483