The Elements of Illuminating Engineering; An Introductory Treatment of the Units, Distribution and Measurement of Light; Types and Characteristics of Lamps, Reflectors and Shades; Photometry and the Planning of Lighting Installations, for

The Elements of Illuminating Engineering; An Introductory Treatment of the Units, Distribution and Measurement of Light; Types and Characteristics of Lamps, Reflectors and Shades; Photometry and the Planning of Lighting Installations, for

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1921 edition. Excerpt: ...arrangement is well adapted for a dining-room table. The cone or dome may be of about the dimensions stated. It should be lined inside with white silk, and covered with silk of a colour harmonizing with the rest of the room. The lamp should be placed as high as possible in the shade, so that no part of the filament is visible. The light has full play on the glass, plate, and decorations, while the faces of those sitting at the table are illuminated mainly by reflection from below, a direction which has been found by long experience on the stage, by those whose business it is to study such matters, to be not displeasing. A half-round shade (Fig. 37) is very useful. It may be made of silk on a wire frame, or of stiff paper, or of bent opal or satin-finished glass. It can be easily arranged so that the filament or gas mantle is not visible from any part of the room. Prismatic Shades. These shades are made of clear glass covered with flutings or grooves of carefully calculated curvature. They are made by pressing the glass while hot into polished iron moulds. In the design there are two distinct objects. The first of these is to reduce brightness by diffusion, as is done by ground glass in a haphazard way, but with much less loss of light; the other is to distribute light by deflecting rays which would have met the working plane at small angles of incidence, and to direct them to the spaces between the lamps. The two objects can be combined. Shades were designed by the author in 1879 and a considerable number were used in 1884. The system was developed by Blondel1-and Psaroudaki, and is now known as holophane. The elaborate calculations in the designs were wasted to a considerable extent owing to the appreciable size of the source of light...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236948114
  • 9781236948113