The Elements of Civil Engineering; Prepared for Students of the International Correspondence Schools, Scranton, Pa. ... Volume 8

The Elements of Civil Engineering; Prepared for Students of the International Correspondence Schools, Scranton, Pa. ... Volume 8

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1899 edition. Excerpt: ...are greatly modified, and the experiments must be conducted in the daytime. The intensity of the colors depends upon the degree of saturation of the bead. It is well at first to use the smallest possible quantities of the substances to be tested, and afterwards increase them by successive additions until a satisfactory degree of saturation is obtained. If too much of the substance has been used, and the bead is so deeply colored that it is difficult to decide what color it has, it may be flattened, while still hot or pasty, on an anvil with the butt end of the blowpipe; or a portion of the bead may be thrown off the wire by a sudden jerk, and the remaining portion diluted with more borax. If the operator is in doubt as to the color, the bead should be viewed through a lens, and compared with beads of known color. In fact, this is the only resource for men who are at all "color-blind." 108. In the R. F.--After the phenomena in the O. F. are carefully noted, the bead is brought into the R. F. and observed as before. The flame should be so managed that no soot is deposited upon the bead. Sometimes it is found necessary to add a little more of the substance to the assay. When metallic oxides and acids are present which are not easily reduced from borax, as the oxides of manganese, iron, uranium, chromium, cobalt, and titanic and tungstic acids, the bead may be treated on platinum wire; but when easily reducible oxides are present, as those of zinc, nickel, cadmium, lead, etc., the wire would be injured (see Art. 64), and the bead must be shaken off after treatment in the O. F. on platinum, and treated in the R. F. on charcoal. After blowing one or two minutes, the bead is pinched with the forceps, and drawn out so that its color...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 138 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 259g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236841913
  • 9781236841919