Elements of Chemisty; Including the Applications of the Science in the Arts. Containing the Metals of the Alkalies, Alkaline Earths, and Earths Proper, with Their Salts Volume 4

Elements of Chemisty; Including the Applications of the Science in the Arts. Containing the Metals of the Alkalies, Alkaline Earths, and Earths Proper, with Their Salts Volume 4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1840 edition. Excerpt: ...the temperature should not be less than 90, otherwise a great waste of the gas occurs from its solution in the water, and also a consequent annoyance to the operator from the escape of the chlorine into the atmosphere, by evaporation from the surface of the water trough. If the gas is not to be used immediately, but preserved, it should be collected in bottles, into which when filled with the gas, their stoppers greased, ' should be inserted before they are removed from the trough. Before the "gas obtained by this process can be considered as pure, it should always be transmitted through water, to remove hydrochloric acid; an intermediate Wolfe's bottle containing water may be employed to wash the gas, as was done with sulphurous acid. If the gas is to be dried, it must be sent through a tube containing chloride of calcium, of two or three feet in length, great difficulty being experienced in drying this gas in a perfect manner, owing to its low diffusive power: it is three times more diflicult to dry than carbonic acid. Chlorine cannot be collected over mercury, as it combines at once with that metal. A somewhat different process for the preparation of chlorine is generally followed on the large scale. About 6 parts of manganese with 8 of common salt are introduced into a large leaden vessel, of a form nearly globular, as represented in the figure, and 5 or 6 feet in diameter, and to these are added as much of the unconcentrated sulphuric acid of the leaden chambers, as is equivalent to 13 parts of oil of vitriol. The leaden vessel is Fro. 40. placed in an iron pan, or has a outer casing 11 e, as represented in the figure, and to heat the materials, steam is admitted by d into the space between the bottom and outer...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 252 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 458g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236816099
  • 9781236816092