An Elementary Treatise on Plumbing, Heating, and Ventilation; Prepared for Students of the International Correspondence Schools ... with Practical Questions and Examples Volume 6

An Elementary Treatise on Plumbing, Heating, and Ventilation; Prepared for Students of the International Correspondence Schools ... with Practical Questions and Examples Volume 6

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1901 edition. Excerpt: ...downwards, and finishing at bottom. A tank iron may be used to maintain proper working heat. Use tallow as the flux. The solder of the finished seam must not overlap the soiled margins. (394) (See Art. 805.) An all'gas flame will tarnish the metal while heating it.' The object of mixing air with the gas is chiefly to avoid the tarnishing effect, and to obtain a higher temperature. (395) (See Art. 816.) Pipe tacks are simply molded supports for pipes. They are usually cast in brass molds from old lead, with a little tin thrown in to harden them, or old wipe joints may be used. A pair of pipe tacks is shown in Fig. 231. (396) (See Art. 657.) Twenty ounces per square foot in weight. 144 X R X 28 cents: $14. Ans. (397) A mixture of lampblack, glue, and water. Rub grease off the surface with chalk. _(See Art. 690.) Heat soil and apply it as thin as possible with a stiff brush. If too much glue is present, the soil will peel off; if too little, it will rub off. (398) The attachment required is a check-valve (see Arts. 760 and 761) put on the pipe so that water may flow from A to B only. The swing check (see Fig. 194) is preferable. (399) (See Art. 776.) By placing zinc chips in muriatic acid. Hydrogen is liberated. (4-.00) "Sweating" means the act of soaking into the seam. (See Art. 781.) Capillary attraction and the affinity of the metals are the powers which cause thesweating. The surfaces inside the seam must be free from tarnish to obtain good sweating. (401) (See Art. 788.) The heat is obtained by pouring the molten solder gently over the joint, at the same time holding the wiping cloth in such position that some solder will be caught in it and applied to heating the under side of the joint. The pipe outside of the joint...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 44 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236808401
  • 9781236808400