An Elementary Treatise on Plumbing, Heating, and Ventilation; Prepared for Students of the International Correspondence Schools ... with Practical Questions and Examples Volume 2

An Elementary Treatise on Plumbing, Heating, and Ventilation; Prepared for Students of the International Correspondence Schools ... with Practical Questions and Examples Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1901 edition. Excerpt: ...be destroyed. Charcoal which is made from wood has little or no value for the purpose of filtration. Water which has grown stale by standing may be greatly improved, and be made suitable for drinking purposes, by the process called aeralion, provided it has not been otherwise polluted. 1034. Aeration may be accomplished in several ways. The water may be squirted into the air in fine streams, air maybe forced through the water in fine bubbles, or air and water may be shaken up or otherwise agitated together. The object to be attained in every case is to expose the water to the action of the air to the greatest practicable extent. In the process of aeration the water absorbs a considerable quantity of air and is thereby greatly improved in appearance and taste. The air has a mild oxidizing effect, which is sufficient to destroy a small amount of vegetable matter and render it harmless. But this purifying influence is very limited in extent, and is of no use whatever for removing or destroying the germs of putrefaction, fermentation, and disease which are imparted to the water by sewage or house drainage. These germs can be killed only by boiling, and in the case of certain disease germs even boiling is insuflicient; they can be completely destroyed only by fire. The process of aeration is thus adapted only to the purpose of fres/zming water and rendering it more palatable, and is not serviceable for actual purification. In all apparatus designed to aerate water, care must be taken to thoroughly exclude all dust from the air, because dust is very apt to carry with it many kinds of germs which give rise to putrefaction and disease.-Dust must be kept out of food and drinking water. 1035. Rain-water which is taken from the roofs of buildings is...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 140 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 263g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236846745
  • 9781236846747