An Elementary Treatise on Astronomy; Adapted to the Present Improved State of the Science, Being the Fourth Part of a Course of Natural Philosophy, C

An Elementary Treatise on Astronomy; Adapted to the Present Improved State of the Science, Being the Fourth Part of a Course of Natural Philosophy, C

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1827 edition. Excerpt: ...places this fact beyond a doubt; but we owe its discovery to the theory of attraction. This inequality is equal to that of the mean motion multiplied by the coefficient--3,00052. If from the mean longitude of the moon we subtract the mean longitude of the lunar perigee, we shall have the mean anomaly of the moon. This anomaly is therefore subject to a seu'ar equation, equal to the difference of the two preceding, that is, to that of the mean motion multiplied by 1-f-3,00052 or 4,00055. 335. The motion of the nodes is also subject to a similar inequality, and of the same sign with that of the perigee. It is equal to that of the mean motion multiplied by--0,735452. As the motion of the nodes is retrograde, it is obvious that this correction tends to augment their longitudes for the centuries posterior to that taken for the origin. All these results are confirmed by observation. 336. It is evident from what is here said that, on account of the secular equations, the motions of the perigee and the motion of the nodes, are retarded, while that of the moon itself is accelerated. Moreover, these inequalities are connected together by very simple ratios, since they are represented by the numbers 1;--3,00052;--0,735452. 337. The anomalistic revolution, depending at once upon the motion of ihe moon and that of the perigee, is likewise modified by the secular equation. The same is true of all the quantities which depend upon the mean longitude, the perigee, or the nodes. 338. The same analysis which disclosed these great phenomena, has shown that the distance of the moon from the earth, the eccentricity and inclination of its orbit, are, in like manner, subject to secular equations connected with those of the mean motion. But their effect has hitherto been...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 152 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 286g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236490924
  • 9781236490926