Elementary and Practical Arithmetic

Elementary and Practical Arithmetic

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 edition. Excerpt: ...to the product when necessary to make up the number. 2. Integral 0s in the right of the multiplier may be omitted, provided the same number of decimal figures be made integral in the multiplicand, --0s being annexed to the multiplicand, when necessary to make up the number. When the multiplier is,10, 100, &.c., the product is thus immediately obtained. Examples. 1. To multiply.19 by.5; that is, to find.5 of.19. ( 116.).19.095 95 thousandths. Multiplying as in integers, we find the product 95; to which we prefix the 0 and the decimal point, to make three decimal figures for the three in the multiplicand and multiplier. 2. To multiply 236 by 3.4. 226X3.4=802.4. In the product 802.4 we have one decimal figure for the one in the multiplier, there being no decimal in the multiplicand. 3. To multiply 48.5 by 300. ' 48.5X300=14550.0. Or, rejecting the two integral 0s in the right of the multiplier, and making two more integral figures in the multiplicand, we have 4850X3=14550; as before. In like manner, 3.45X100=345 3.45X1000=3450; and so on; in which cases the products are immediately obtained by making as many additional integral figures in the multiplicand, as there are integral 0s in the right of the multiplier;--annexing 0s to the multiplicand, when necessary to make up the number.! j- In the first example, if we multiply the two quantities together under the form of vulgar fractions, we shall have To express the product Tj by a decimal, requires as many decimal figures as there are 0s in the denominator 1000; ( 128;) or in the two denominators 100 and 10; that is, as many decimal figures as there are figures in the two numerators 1 9 and 5. Ill general terms, the product of two decimal fractions must contain just as many...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 82 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 163g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236612256
  • 9781236612250