Elegantiae Latinae, Or, Rules and Exercises Illustrative of Elegant Latin Style; Intended for the Use of the Middle and Higher Classes of Grammar Schools to Which Is Added, the Original Latin of the Most Difficult Phrases

Elegantiae Latinae, Or, Rules and Exercises Illustrative of Elegant Latin Style; Intended for the Use of the Middle and Higher Classes of Grammar Schools to Which Is Added, the Original Latin of the Most Difficult Phrases

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1837 edition. Excerpt: ...towards his person. But these are tbe deeds of arms and of victory, and not of Caesar. 2. Yet you will say, that it was I who advised him to it; as if he could not have done a service to his country, without an adviser. But again you will object that I rejoiced at it. What, amidst such universal joy, was there any reason why I should be the only dejected person in Rome? In the connexion of several arguments, the Latins do not enumerate them by primd, secundd, tertid, $c. but by primiim, deinde, tum, denique, postremd; and instead of those words of enumeration, as tum, prceterea, insuper, fyc. other forms of connexion may be used, as accedit quod; ut taceam, omittam, c. EXAMPLE. We must first consider, that our kindness should hurt nobody; secondly, that it should not be above our faculties; thirdly, that it may be exercised with dignity; and, lastly, that it be most honorable. CHAP. IV. OF THE SIMPLE VARIATION OF WORDS. As nothing contributes more to elegance of style than a change or variation of words, to which the scholar should be early introduced, we shall briefly show how it may be effected. This variation is either simple, and consists in the mere change of one word into another synonymous word or phrase, or it is rhetorical or ornamental, as by the accession of another expression, more full, dignified, or smooth, the simple idea receives greater ornament, and by this metaphorical and circuitous manner, assumes the form of a period. But we shall not treat so fully of this last, till we come to speak of perspicuity and copiousness. Thus, to give an example of a simple variation by means of a synonymous phrase: Ingenium est omnium hominum a labore prodive ad libidinem.--Ter. May be varied thus: Ea est omnium mortalium indoles ut a labore ad...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 68 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236596692
  • 9781236596697