Electrolysis in Concrete; E.B. Rosa, Chief Physicist, Burton McCollum, Associate Physicist, and O.S. Peters, Assistant Physicist, Bureau of Standards Volume 12-19

Electrolysis in Concrete; E.B. Rosa, Chief Physicist, Burton McCollum, Associate Physicist, and O.S. Peters, Assistant Physicist, Bureau of Standards Volume 12-19

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1919 edition. Excerpt: ...with two coats of an alkali-resisting preservative paint. After the setting process had continued for approximately two weeks the test was commenced. Each specimen was placed in a crystallizing dish 5 inches in diameter by 2 inches deep and surrounded by a sheet-iron cylinder, which served as the cathode. The dish was then filled to within one-fourth inch of the top of the cube with distilled water, and the specimen put in circuit on 15 volts with the central electrode anode. The current density averaged about 0.025 ampere per square inch of anode surface at the beginning and gradually decreased to about 0.005 ampere per square inch at the end of the test. Current flowed continuously with the exception of 33 hours each week, current readings being taken at intervals, which increased as the test proceeded. When cracking occurred, or, if cracking did not occur, as soon as a sufficient number of ampere-hours had passed to give a reliable indication of the efficiency of corrosion, the specimens were removed from the circuit and broken open. The corroded electrodes were cleaned by a process hereafter described and then weighed and the losses determined. The current readings were plotted as a function of time, and the area included between the axes and the curve integrated by means of a planimeter. The area of the curve and the scale to which it was drawn gave the number of ampere-hours which had passed through the specimen; multiplying by 1.045 gave the amount of corrosion which would have occurred if the iron had dissolved in accordance with Faraday's law. Dividing the theoretical amount into the amount observed gave the efficiency of corrosion as defined above. Table 11 contains the condensed data. TABLE 11 TABLE 11--Continued Efficiency of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 42 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236926277
  • 9781236926272