Electric Power; A Monthly New Journal Devoted to the Financial, Mechanical and Theoretical Interests of the Electrical Transmission of Power Volume 1

Electric Power; A Monthly New Journal Devoted to the Financial, Mechanical and Theoretical Interests of the Electrical Transmission of Power Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1889 edition. Excerpt: ...be that of a fraction of one horse-power. In Boston the cost of one horse-power a year ten hours a day, is 560. So if it were to be supplied for twenty-four hours, the cost would be very small. He would have the carriage made larger, so that, instead of carrying I, ooo letters, as estiinated for the model, it would carry 10,000. A car as large as that could be despatched from the Boston Post-oflice every five minutes during the twenty-four hours, ifneed be, for the New York Post-oflice. Stations could be established.along the route for furnishing the electrical force which might be needed. (Mr. Williams said in his explanation that probably five stations would be needed between Boston and New York.) Mails could be easily transported with great speed and at small cost. Only as much power as was needed would be used, for the invention would automatically return to the station all of the power which was not needed. The expense of the system could be reduced by having the coils further apart. Perhaps they need not be nearer to each other than twenty feet. The length of the car might be increased to ten or twelve feet. The size of the apparatus might be increased with an increase of its speed and fl'ICIency. Instead of being limited to the carrying of mail matter and packages, he thought that the apparatus might be enlarged so as to carry a person and very probably several persons at once. Nothing was improbable about this invention; nothing was impossible. He thought that it was probable that his listeners would witness the time when this invention will carry persons from Boston to New York at an incredibly high rate of speed. It should be mentioned that Mr. Williams, in his explanation, said that it was the remark of the late Postmaster...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 454 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 23mm | 803g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123696036X
  • 9781236960368