Edward Weston
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Edward Weston : The Flame of Recognition

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Description

This classic monograph, first issued as a hardcover volume in 1965, began its life in 1958 as a monographic issue of Aperture magazine published in celebration of Weston's life. Drawing on a decades-long collaboration between the photographer and Nancy Newhall, Aperture cofounder and early MoMA curator, this volume brings together a sequence of images and excerpts from Weston's writing in an effort to channel the photographer's spirit of creativity and, in his own words, "present clearly my feeling for life with photographic beauty . . . without subterfuge or evasion in spirit or technique." Now, fifty years later, Aperture is pleased to present a reissue of this volume, which covers the range of Weston's greatest works. Accompanying and amplifying the images are Weston's own thoughts, excerpted from his now-famed Daybooks and letters. Others who contributed to the making of the book include two of the artist's sons, Brett and Cole, and two other Aperture cofounders: filmmaker and author Dody Weston Thompson and photographer Ansel Adams, whose essay on the jacket offers a posthumous tribute to a remarkable artist and his oeuvre. A brief bibliography as well as a chronology offer further insight into the life and work of this giant of twentieth-century photography.
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Product details

  • Hardback | 112 pages
  • 210 x 247 x 20.32mm | 770g
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • Special edition
  • 50th Anniversary Edition
  • Illustrated in duotone throughout
  • 1597113107
  • 9781597113106
  • 6,583

Review quote

It comes as quite a shock to see pictures that aspire so unabashedly to high art, that are so conspicuously beautiful, as Edward Weston's nudes. -The New York Times
Connoisseur of the sensual -The New York Times
As Edward Weston: Portraits shows, Weston didn't just photograph women, he exposed them. They fill the frame, they spill over it; their bodies are cropped so that discrete parts--legs, feet, and buttocks, the curve of ribs and breast--become the entire subject. It's as though the lens, and the photographer behind it, were touching and caressing them. -Vogue It comes as quite a shock to see pictures that aspire so unabashedly to high art, that are so conspicuously beautiful, as Edward Weston s nudes. "The New York Times"

Connoisseur of the sensual "The New York Times"

As "Edward Weston: Portraits" shows, Weston didn't just photograph women, he exposed them. They fill the frame, they spill over it; their bodies are cropped so that discrete parts legs, feet, and buttocks, the curve of ribs and breast become the entire subject. It's as though the lens, and the photographer behind it, were touching and caressing them. "Vogue"" "As "Edward Weston: Portraits" shows, Weston didn't just photograph women, he exposed them. They fill the frame, they spill over it; their bodies are cropped so that discrete parts--legs, feet, and buttocks, the curve of ribs and breast--become the entire subject. It's as though the lens, and the photographer behind it, were touching and caressing them."--Michael Boodro, "Vogue" "As "Edward Weston: Portraits shows, Weston didn't just photograph women, he exposed them. They fill the frame, they spill over it; their bodies are cropped so that discrete parts--legs, feet, and buttocks, the curve of ribs and breast--become the entire subject. It's as though the lens, and the photographer behind it, were touching and caressing them."--Michael Boodro, "Vogue
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About Nancy Newhall

Edward Weston began to earn an international reputation for his portrait work in 1911. From 1923 to 1926 he worked in Mexico and California, where he lived with his sons, turning increasingly to subjects such as nudes, clouds, and close-ups of rocks, trees, vegetables, and shells. On a Guggenheim Fellowship from 1937 to 1939, he photographed throughout the American West. In 1948 Weston made his last photograph; he had been stricken with Parkinson's disease several years earlier. Edward Weston began to earn an international reputation for his portrait work in 1911. From 1923 to 1926 he worked in Mexico and California, where he lived with his sons, turning increasingly to subjects such as nudes, clouds, and close-ups of rocks, trees, vegetables, and shells. On a Guggenheim Fellowship from 1937 to 1939, he photographed throughout the American West. In 1948 Weston made his last photograph; he had been stricken with Parkinson's disease several years earlier. Nancy Newhall was a photo historian, writer, and acting curator of photography at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, from 1942 to 1946, where she organized a major retrospective of Weston's work. She helped cofound Aperture in 1952. Nancy Newhall was a photo historian, writer, and acting curator of photography at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, from 1942 to 1946, where she organized a major retrospective of Weston's work. She helped cofound Aperture in 1952. Photographer and environmentalist Ansel Adams was a founding member of Aperture and the famed Group f/64.
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Rating details

37 ratings
4.32 out of 5 stars
5 54% (20)
4 30% (11)
3 11% (4)
2 5% (2)
1 0% (0)
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