Edmund Spenser's Knight of the Red Cross; Or Holiness [The Faerie Queene, Book 1]. the Antique Spelling Is Modernized, Obsolete Words Are Displaced [&C., by W. Horton].

Edmund Spenser's Knight of the Red Cross; Or Holiness [The Faerie Queene, Book 1]. the Antique Spelling Is Modernized, Obsolete Words Are Displaced [&C., by W. Horton].

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1850 edition. Excerpt: ...Fidessa's name. Who when, returning from the dreary Night, She found not in that perilous house of Pride, Where she had left, the noble Redcross knight, Her hoped prey, she would no longer bide, But forth she went to seek him far and wide. Ere long she found where he had weary sat To rest himself, close by a fountain side, Disarmed all of iron-coated plate; And by his side his steed the grassy forage ate. He feeds upon the cooling shade, and bays bathes His sweaty forehead in the breathing wind, Which through the trembling leaves full gently plays, Wherein the cheerful birds of sundry kind Do chant sweet music to delight his mind: The witch approaching did him fairly greet, And with reproach of carelessness unkind Upbraid, for leaving her in place unmeet, With foul words tempering fair, sour gall with honey sweet. Unkindness past, they did of solace treat, And bathe in pleasures of the joyous shade, Which shielded them against the boiling heat, And with green boughs decking a gloomy shade, About the fountain like a garland made; Whose bubbling wave did ever freshly well, Nor ever would through fervent summer fade: The sacred nymph who there was wont to dwell, Was out of Dian's favour, as it then befell. The cause was this: one day when Phoebe fair, With all her band, was following the chase, This nymph, quite tired with heat of scorching air, Sat down to rest in middest of the race: The goddess wroth did foully her disgrace, And bade the waters, which frqm her did flow, Be such as she herself was then in place. Thenceforth the waters waxed dull and slow, And all who drink thereof do faint and feeble grow, Hereof this gentle knight unknowing was; And lying dowu upon the sandy grail, gravel Drunk of the stream, as clear as crystal glass; Forthwith...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 58 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 122g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236489349
  • 9781236489340