Ecothrifty

Ecothrifty : Cheaper, Greener Choices for a Happier, Healthier Life

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Description

Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without-our grandmothers knew the importance of responsible, thrifty choices. But somewhere along the way we lost our way and succumbed to the belief that we can get everything for next to nothing, have it shipped halfway around the world and then, more often than not, just throw it away. This consumer binge is taking its toll. Diet and lifestyle-related illnesses are epidemic, our environment is awash in a sea of plastic, our climate is changing, and the cost of everything is skyrocketing with the price of oil. Are we doomed? No. We can make greener, healthier choices, and we can do it while saving money. Where to start?
Ecofrugal is packed with simple, practical ideas and recipes to help you: * Make homemade products for cleaning and skin care * Grow your own food and cook more from scratch * Raise your family without lowering your standards A must-read for anyone who has ever wanted to live a greener life but thought that it would be too expensive, time-consuming, or difficult, this handy, complete guide will show you how small changes can have a huge environmental impact and save you thousands of dollars, all while improving your quality of life. Deborah Niemann is a homesteader, writer, and self-sufficiency expert. The author of Homegrown and Handmade: A Practical Guide to More Self-Reliant Living, she presents extensively on topics including soapmaking, breadbaking, cheesemaking, composting, and homeschooling.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 208 pages
  • 153 x 229 x 15.24mm | 327g
  • Gabriola Island, United States
  • English
  • B&W photographs and illustrations throughout
  • 086571715X
  • 9780865717152
  • 1,373,943

Back cover copy

Save the Earth without costing the earth I support & endorse this wonderful book, 100%." - Ed Begley, Jr. Actor / Environmentalist Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without - it turns out that Grandma knew best after all. But somewhere along the way we forgot what Grandma taught us and succumbed to the belief that we can get everything for next to nothing, have it shipped halfway around the world and then, more often than not, just throw it away. This consumer binge has taken an enormous toll on our health, our pocketbook and our planet. Are we doomed? No. We can make greener, healthier choices, and we can do it while saving money. Where to start? Ecothrifty is packed with simple, practical ideas and recipes to help you:
- Make homemade products for cleaning and skin care
- Grow your own food and cook more from scratch
- Raise your family without lowering your standards. A must-read for anyone who has ever wanted to live a greener life but thought that it would be too expensive, time-consuming or difficult, this handy, complete guide shows how simple changes in everyday habits can have a huge environmental impact and save you thousands of dollars, all while improving your quality of life. Deborah Niemann is a homesteader, writer and self-sufficiency expert. The author of Homegrown and Handmade: A Practical Guide to More Self-Reliant Living, she presents extensively on topics including soapmaking, breadbaking, cheesemaking, composting and homeschooling. To help bring you the very best inspiration and information about greener, more sustainable lifestyles, Mother Earth News is recommending select New Society Publishers books to its readers. This book is one of them. MEN LOGO
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Table of contents

Table of Contents
Ecofrugal: Cheaper, Greener Choices for a Happier, Healthier Life
Deborah Niemann

I. Introduction (sample: 1,700 words)
II. Free or almost free stuff (sample: 1,600 words)
a. Try bartering.
b. Get free advice via Internet groups.
c. Use Freecycle.
d. What about free stuff online?
III. Health and fitness
a. Avoid doctors and drugs when possible. (500 words)
b. Dental care
i. Proper brushing and flossing
ii. Do you need toothpaste?
c. Feminine products
i. Reusable pads
ii. "The Keeper"
iii. Natural personal lubricant (ingredients of commercial products)
d. Eye glasses
i. Buy new/used frames at thrift store
ii. What about using frames from reading glasses? (cheaper)
e. Herbal supplements: fill your own gelatin capsules (Frontier Herbs)
f. Exercise
i. Give up your gym membership (saves gas and money for membership)
ii. Home exercise, yoga
iii. Walk or bike to places (use backpack)
iv. Other thoughts on weight loss
IV. Clothes
a. How many clothes do you really need?
b. Used vs. new
i. Sue (LLL) bought yard sale clothes and when her son moved out, he learned he was allergic to sizing on new clothes
ii. You try on clothes at the store, and other people have also tried them on
c. Yard sales
d. Thrift stores (Can sometimes find things like wedding dresses and tuxedos)
e. Laundry
i. Detergent
ii. Washing in hot vs cold water
iii. Dryer vs. clothes line
iv. Ironing
1. can of starch versus dry mixed with water
2. iron when wet
f. Mending and deciding when to throw out something
g. Second life for old clothes (jeans become a purse)
V. Cosmetics and beauty
a. Make your own soap
b. Baking soda facial scrub
c. Homemade sugar or salt scrubs
d. Shampoo or not?
e. Go to a beauty school for haircuts
f. Learn to cut your family's hair
g. Shaving
VI. Home
a. Compact fluorescent bulbs
b. Turn off appliances when not in use (printer, computer)
c. Home renovation
i. Do you really need to do it?
ii. Do it yourself?
iii. Paint -
1. buy "oops" paint
2. mix paint leftovers
3. make milk paint
4. whitewash
d. Cleaners
i. Vinegar
ii. Baking soda
iii. Toilet bowl (Tim story: swipe daily a la Flylady with no cleaner. "What about the germs?")
e. Dishwasher vs hand washing
f. Telephone
g. Make braided rugs from scraps
h. Furniture
i. Auctions
ii. Making twig furniture
VII. Food
a. Cost of food
b. Only eat what you need
i. No junk food
c. Eat seasonally
d. Eat locally
e. Eat organic
f. Meat
g. Meal planning and shopping
i. Coupons
ii. Food salvage stores
iii. Once-a-month shopping
h. Bread
i. Refrigerator dough
ii. Sourdough bread
i. Dried beans
j. Mixes (compare cost of homemade to cost of cake mix, muffins, etc)
i. Don't buy little single-serving packages of seasoning mixes
ii. Homemade mixes
k. Making yogurt
l. Make a solar oven
m. Use a freezer
i. Upright vs. chest
ii. buy bulk
iii. freeze garden produce
n. Canning
o. Dehydrating food
p. Use a crockpot
q. Use cast iron
r. Use cloth napkins
s. Breakfast (compare cost of cereal or granola bars to home-cooked)
i. Oatmeal or rice and milk for breakfast
ii. Homemade biscuits vs. canned or frozen biscuits
iii. Yogurt smoothies
iv. Egg sandwich with homemade English muffin
t. Lunches
i. Baked potatoes
ii. Pasta salads (master recipe)
iii. Healthy sandwiches (no luncheon meats)
u. Dinners
i. Quiches
ii. Cream soups
iii. Master casserole recipe
v. Desserts
i. Cost and time to make desserts at home
ii. Pies
iii. Brownies
w. Snacks
x. Home-brewing beer
VIII. Gardening
a. Save seeds
b. Indoor gardening
i. Sprouts
ii. Tomatoes after the first frost
c. Using a cold frame
IX. Babies & kids
a. Use a midwife
b. Breastfeed
c. Cloth diapers
d. Avoid disposable baby wipes
e. Make your own baby food
f. Toys
g. Birthday parties
i. Kids get to make their own personal pizzas
ii. Make cake from scratch
iii. Skip the plastic party favors
h. Used book sales at libraries
X. Travel
a. Auctions
i. Police auctions (cars and bicycles)
ii. Bank or credit union auctions (cars)
iii. Estate or farm auctions
b. Car care
i. Will higher octane give better gas mileage? What about tire inflation, etc?
ii. Keeping an older car versus getting a new one?
iii. New vs used?
iv. Local college or vocational school for repairs
v. Don't wash it (leave it out in the rain)
XI. Entertainment
a. Quilting with scraps
b. Rug braiding
c. Television, drop cable
d. Music, iPod
XII. Christmas
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Review quote

Following her eco-friendly debut, Homegrown and Handmade: A Practical Guide to More Self-Reliant Living, self-sufficiency expert Niemann focuses now on practical ways to be green while saving money through informed consumer choices, such as how to avoid buying toxic products or their expensive alternatives (e.g., making laundry detergent with washing soda, borax, and soap) to reducing environmental harm and support personal health. In every chapter, from food to home to transportation, Niemann includes recipes or other straightforward guidance, along with cost comparisons, to make her ideas accessible and seemingly easy to implement. Because she covers so much territory, some ideas are bound to pique readers' interest, whether wine- or soap-making, gardening, bread baking, or clothes swapping parties. A homesteader herself, Niemann does not forgo technology when it provides the cleanest and cheapest option. She acknowledges, for instance, that using a reel mower for lawn care may not be practical for large lawns or busy people, and so she describes the differences between electric- and gas-powered options. Likewise, in her chapter on free stuff, Niemann discusses foraging in parks as well as foraging online. Small testimonials sprinkled throughout the book complement Niemann's encouraging tone, so that her advice does not come across as self-righteous or preachy, but more like insider tips from an experienced do-it-yourselfer. - Publishers Weekly review I support & endorse this wonderful book, 100%. -- Ed Begley, Jr. Actor / Environmentalist Those of us embarking on the journey of consuming less and enjoying ourselves more desperately need guidebooks, and Deborah Niemann has written one for us. Ecothrifty leads us gently down the path of changing the way we think about what we buy. I hope you will find this book the beginning of your engagement in a global movement to create a family life that is rich and abundant while sitting lighter on the planet that holds us all. -- Kathy Harrison, from the Foreword If you care about the future of the Earth and her ecosystems and want to make a difference, pick up a copy of this book and read it cover to cover. You're in for a treat! This book is chock-full of valuable information that could change your lifestyle and help create a sustainable world. Ecothrifty should be required reading for every citizen of the world. Dan Chiras, Director, The Evergreen Institute, and author of The Homeowner's Guide to Renewable Energy, and Power from the Sun evergreeninstitute.org
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About Deborah Niemann

Deborah Niemann is a homesteader, writer and self-sufficiency expert who presents extensively on topics including soapmaking, breadbaking, cheesemaking, composting and homeschooling. The author of Homegrown and Handmade: A Practical Guide to More Self-Reliant Living, she and her family produce all of their own meat, eggs, and dairy products, by raising sheep, pigs, cattle, goats, chickens, and turkeys, while an organic garden and orchard provide fruit and vegetables.
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Rating details

199 ratings
3.23 out of 5 stars
5 10% (20)
4 28% (56)
3 41% (81)
2 17% (34)
1 4% (8)
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