Ecological Thinking
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Ecological Thinking : The Politics of Epistemic Location

3.78 (18 ratings by Goodreads)
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3.78 (18 ratings by Goodreads)

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Description

How could ecological thinking animate an epistemology capable of addressing feminist, multicultural, and other post-colonial concerns? Starting from an epistemological approach implicit in Rachel Carson's scientific practice, Lorraine Code elaborates the creative, restructuring resources of ecology for a theory of knowledge. She critiques the instrumental rationality, abstract individualism, and exploitation of people and places that western epistemologies of mastery
have legitimated, to propose a politics of epistemic location, sensitive to the interplay of particularity and diversity, and focused on responsible epistemic practice.
Drawing on ecological theory and practice, on naturalized epistemology, and on feminist and post-colonial theories, Code analyzes extended examples from developmental psychology, and from two "natural" institutions of knowledge production-medicine and law. These institutions lend themselves well to a reconfigured naturalism. They are, in practice, empirically-scientifically informed, specifically situated, and locally interpretive. With human subjects as their "objects" of knowledge, they
invoke the responsibility requirements central to Code's larger project.
This book discusses a wide range of literature in philosophy, social science, and ethico-political thought. Highly innovative, it will generate productive conversations in feminist theory, and in the ethics and politics of knowledge more broadly conceived.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 344 pages
  • 157 x 236 x 19mm | 487g
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • 7 halftones
  • 0195159446
  • 9780195159448
  • 856,911

Table of contents

Introduction
1: Ecological Thinking: Subversions and Transformations
2: Ecological Naturalism
3: Negotiating Empiricism
4: Ecological Subjectivity in the Making: "The Child" as Fact and Artifact
5: Patterns of Autonomy, Acknowledgment, and Advocacy
6: Rational Imagining, Responsible Knowing
7: Public Knowledge, Public Trust: Toward Democratic Epistemic Practices
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
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Review Text

Professor Code provides a rich and sensitive epistemology, an erudite yet eminently readable account of how we know and ought to behave. Her insights, arguments, and examples break new ground in helping us understand the dangers of autonomy, the role of advocacy, and the wisdom of ecological thinking. Anyone in ethics, epistemology, or feminist philosophy must read her book. Kristin Shrader-Frechette, University of Notre Dame
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Review quote

Professor Code provides a rich and sensitive epistemology, an erudite yet eminently readable account of how we know and ought to behave. Her insights, arguments, and examples break new ground in helping us understand the dangers of autonomy, the role of advocacy, and the wisdom of ecological thinking. Anyone in ethics, epistemology, or feminist philosophy must read her book. * Kristin Shrader-Frechette, University of Notre Dame *
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About Lorraine Code

Lorraine Code is Distinguished Research Professor in the Department of Philosophy at York University in Toronto, Canada and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. She is the author of Epistemic Responsibility (1987), What Can She Know? (1991), Rhetorical Spaces (1995); editor of the Routledge Encyclopaedia of Feminist Theories (2000), and Feminist Interpretations of Hans-Georg Gadamer (2003); and
co-translator of Michele Le Duff The Sex of Knowing (2003).
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Rating details

3.78 out of 5 stars
- 18 ratings
5 22% (4)
4 44% (8)
3 28% (5)
2 0% (0)
1 6% (1)
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