Ecce Femina; An Attempt to Solve the Woman Question. Being an Examination of Arguments in Favor of Female Suffrage by John Stuart Mill and Others, and a Presentation of Arguments Against the Proposed Change in the Constitution of Volume 3

Ecce Femina; An Attempt to Solve the Woman Question. Being an Examination of Arguments in Favor of Female Suffrage by John Stuart Mill and Others, and a Presentation of Arguments Against the Proposed Change in the Constitution of Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1870 edition. Excerpt: ...the sexes is impossible. Their interests are so related and interblended, that no power can separate them, much less array them under opposing standards. And, when one man and one woman are joined together by love in the holy state of matrimony, they are no more twain, but one flesh. Any conflict between them would be as unnatural as a conflict between the different members of the same body. The husband who attempts to oppress or degrade his wife is a madman, who hates his own flesh. No reconstruction of society, therefore, is needed to abolish this imaginary antagonism between the sexes." In accordance, then, with the principle involved in popular suffrage, which our forefathers established, there is no reason why the number of votes should be increased by making it the duty of women to vote, as well as men; but there are many reasons against it. The supposition that the family can have two purposes is subversive of the very existence of v this institution which God established in the garden of Eden. Our fathers thought it sufficient that all classes were made voters. It certainly is impossible to allow all individuals to go to the ballot-box. If female suffrage was adopted, only two-sevenths of the population would be voters; so that voting, even then, would be done by two persons for themselves and five others. The principle which the Innovators condemn would still exist. To place the ballot in the hands of even half of the whole population, it must be given to more than half of those who are now considered minors. We consider the ties of affection strong enough to hinder fathers from making unjust laws in regard to their children; and, for the same reason, they can be trusted to perform this duty for their wives. Because minors above...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 52 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123662436X
  • 9781236624369