An Easy Introduction to the Game of Chess; Containing One Hundred Examples of Games, and a Great Variety of Critical Situations and Conclusions, Incl

An Easy Introduction to the Game of Chess; Containing One Hundred Examples of Games, and a Great Variety of Critical Situations and Conclusions, Incl

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1806 edition. Excerpt: ... ease your adversary Mould have sacrificed his Knight 45 to your Pawn 38, anil afterwards given you chejk with his Queen on 32, which would have lost you the game: the second, hy moving your Pawn 31 10 39; for which see Game 18. Set Game 19. (jif Sett Games 20 and 21. Sec Game 22. (c) IT, instead of this, you had taken his jJishop 31 with your Queen, or had taken his Knight 46 with your Bishop 29, you would have lost the game. (rf) After the last move of the White, it is evidently a drawn game, unless some very great error is committed. ftV See Games 7S and 8o. () Having now recovered a Pawn on your King's line, which you lost on the nth move, ana sustained as it is, being equal to one of the best Pieces, you undoubtedly must vrin the game. r-See Games r5 and 18. (a) This is to make room for your attacking your adversary's King with your Bishop o. (jd-See Game 17. ( 3-See Game Ij. (a) Because your adversary, by playing his Bishop 38, attacks your Queen with his Rook 62; or if ycu move your Queen, lie takes your Knight 7 with his Bishop 3;. (a) This move is to enable you afterwards to attack your adversary's Bishop 35, and Gambit Pawn 37, by pushing yoer Pawn 1 x to 28. 3r See the following Game. (a) If, instead of this, you had supported your Pawn 14 (which your adversary's Bishop 35 attacks) by moving your Queen to 13, he would then have taken your Pawn 10 with his Queen, and afterwards your rook. See Game zo. (.) This move defends your Pawn io and 2i against the attack of your adversary's Queen. (a) It would have been better to have moved your Pawn 14 to 30, instead of this move, as you will see by Game 23. (i) There are two other ways of playing this move. See Games 24 and 25 (e)-If you had moved your Queen to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236801415
  • 9781236801418