The Eastern Origin of the Celtic Nations Proved by a Comparison of Their Dialects with the Sanskrit, Greek, Latin, and Teutonic Languages, Forming a Supplement to Researches Into the Physical History of Mankind

The Eastern Origin of the Celtic Nations Proved by a Comparison of Their Dialects with the Sanskrit, Greek, Latin, and Teutonic Languages, Forming a Supplement to Researches Into the Physical History of Mankind

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1857 edition. Excerpt: ...Sylla, who, we must remember, was a young man. This throws us upon the general historians of the period--Q. C. Quadrigarius and Valerius Antias--writers who had, certainly, opportunities of knowing the details of all that was done by the Roman armies, either in or out of the presence of the enemy, as well as much of what was done by the enemy in presence of the Roman armies. In allowing them all due and reasonable accuracy on these points, it is not too much to hold that a great deal of what was effected between the several engagements, such as invasions of neutral countries, alliances, and the like, must have been most imperfectly understood. That the original accounts, however, are lost, is well known. We have nothing, at first-hand, of either of the authors just named. Neither have we the books of Livy which treated of the years 11.0. 113--101. We have the Epitome, and we have the copyists and compilers; but we have not Livy himself. The nearest authorities are Strabo, representing Posidonius, and Plutarch. Of these, the former gives us nothing definite; the latter confesses his ignorance as to their origin. Surely this justifies a considerable amount of doubt; the more so as the question is one of great importance. Who the Cimbri, and who the Teutones were, are points which complicate numberless ethnological investigations. They complicate those of the Cambrian Welshmen; the Cumbrians of Cumberland, the Belgae, the populations of Jutland or the Cimhric Chersonese, the Cimmerii, the Crim Tartars, the scriptural descendants of Gomer, etc. They complicate also the history of the Teutonarii, the Saltus Teutobergius, and the Dutch in general, by which is meant anything German, anything Gothic. The names alone do this--Teutones on one side, ..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 112 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236960416
  • 9781236960412