Eastern Hospitals and English Nurses; The Narrative of Twelve Months Experience in the Hospitals of Koulali and Scutari Volume 2

Eastern Hospitals and English Nurses; The Narrative of Twelve Months Experience in the Hospitals of Koulali and Scutari Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1856 edition. Excerpt: ...to the Barrack Hospital; but the Sisters would be homeless. Two of us dressed in haste, and went out. As we approached the foot of the hill, a body of troops rushed down. They perceived us, and a sergeant stopped to inform us that some gunpowder, kept in a shed not far from the General Hospital, had taken fire and exploded, which was the sound we heard. FEARS DISPELLED. No danger had occurred, and no lives were lost, though, on the first alarm, all the troops, British and Turkish, were turned out; and the sergeant declared he was asleep, dreaming Sebastopol was taken, and when the sudden call came, he thought it was to summon him to the assault. We hastened home to quell the anxiety of our companions; and the alarm over, the laughing began, as we who had been out declared they all looked like Turkish ladies in feridgees, sitting on the divan of the corridor. When the day came, we went to congratulate the Sisters on their escape. They said they had been much alarmed, the explosion being so very near their apartments; and when they were awakened by the sudden noise, and immediately afterwards the tramp of the troops coming up the hill, one of them confessed she thought the Russians had come! at which we all laughed very much. One morning when we came down to A PALACE ON FIEB. 1S3 prayers we saw a fire on the opposite coast. Tlie villages are so thickly joined together that we could hardly distinguish where it was. It was a palace of the Sultan, said to belong to the Sultan's sister. If it was this palace, one was not sorry to see it burnt down; for horrible traditions attach to the name of Asma, Sultan Mahmoud's sister; and, it is said, from underneath a low arch bodies were often seen to float into the Bosphorus from her palace. Whether it was her...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 46 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 100g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236485734
  • 9781236485731