Early History of the Colony of Victoria; From Its Discovery to Its Establishment as a Self-Governing Province of the British Empire Volume 1

Early History of the Colony of Victoria; From Its Discovery to Its Establishment as a Self-Governing Province of the British Empire Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1878 edition. Excerpt: ...CONDEMNATION.i Governor King wishes an establishment kept at Port Phillip--Writes to Lord Hobart on the subject--Bobbins and Oxley sent to, and report unfavourably of, Western Port--Idea of settlement there or at Port Phillip falls through--Oxley's observations about Bass's Strait--Death of Governor King--Oxley's Macquarie and Lachlan expeditions result in a sweeping condemnation of country--Extracts from despatches--Oxley proves to demonstration the non-existence of real facts--Country first officially named Australia--William Wentworth volunteers as an explorer--Letters of Sir Eobert Peel and Sir Humphrey Davy--An amusing suggestion--" A comfortable provision foi a fast-increasing family." Besides expeditions, yet to be recorded, made to the territory of Victoria, prior to its final colonization, a few things were said and done respecting the country, during the years it lay under the hasty and unjust condemnation of Collins and his party, which cannot be omitted from any historical account professing to be accurate and complete. We have seen that Governor King, in writing to Collins, Dec. 30th, 1803, says that he thought it necessary that a i It will be convenient to state, once for all, that the documents quoted in this Chapter are to be found in the N. S. Wales Correspondence in the Record Office. small establishment should be left at Port Phillip in the the most eligible situation, and suggests that a trusty Serjeant and superintendent might be sufficient, until further instructions should be received from England. But, although the remainder of the expedition under Lieutenant Sladden did not leave until May 18th, 1804, for some reason, no notice appears to have been taken of Governor King's desire. At the very time when the place...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 122 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 231g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236627733
  • 9781236627735