Du Pont Farmer's Handbook; Instructions in the Use of Dynamite for Clearing Land, Planting and Cultivating Trees, Drainage, Ditching and Subsoiling

Du Pont Farmer's Handbook; Instructions in the Use of Dynamite for Clearing Land, Planting and Cultivating Trees, Drainage, Ditching and Subsoiling

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 edition. Excerpt: ... with dynamite have shown marked improvement over those that were simply worked the old way. Although I have had only one season to observe these results, I really expect better results from now on. I may add that the time and labor saved is by no means a small item. By using dynamite, I simply had to ram the bar down about two feet, place a small charge, wh1ch cost less than two cents, and was sufficiently strong enough to pun the ground up and around a reasonable distance. With such gratifying results it makes a fellow feel bad when he thinks of the labor and time spent the past three years working around trees the old way, and I assure you from now on it will be dynamite for mine. Very truly yours, PAUL C. BISCHOFF.. From a Professor of Horticulture Bozeman, Mont., Oct. 3, 1911. I have been very much interested in the work which you are carrying on to demonstrate the value of dynamite upon the farm, but I am especially interested in the use of this material in planting trees, both as a means of digging the holes and as a means of shaking up the subsoil. It has been intimated by some that the fruit trees in some of our irrigated sections are shallow rooted, and it is no doubt true. Two conditions are met with in arid sections, which I believe do induce fruit trees to root shallow. One is a hard subsoil, through which the tree roots are unable to force their way. This layer of subsoil is often thin and could easily be shaken up with dynamite. Once the roots of the young trees are through this soil, they would find conditions for growth good below this hard layer, commonly referred to as hardpan. Another condition, which is just as frequently responsible, I believe, is a dry subsoil which does not invite the growth of roots in that direction. In...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 54 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 113g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236655109
  • 9781236655103