The Dramatic Works; With a Life of the Poet, and Remarks on His Writings by J. Payne Collier. the Golden and Silver Ages Two Plays Volume N . 2

The Dramatic Works; With a Life of the Poet, and Remarks on His Writings by J. Payne Collier. the Golden and Silver Ages Two Plays Volume N . 2

By (author) 

List price: US$19.99

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1851 edition. Excerpt: ...of the word, instead of "bereaved." Page 49, line 16, Hyperion, d' on your arms. So etymologically printed in the old copy; but generally do on is reduced to one word, don, without any apostrophe. Instances almost numberless might be cited. In the. same way, def is d' of, or do of Page 50, line 7, Of Creta's crown. The ' old printer usually spelt Crete, Creet, because Heywood uses it commonly as a monosyllable. Page 53, line 12, Let all the deities The old copy has raryeties, which is nonsense: "the deities" may be the true reading, and it suits the metre of the line. Page 53, line 21, Corsive, worse than the throes of child-birth. i.e., corrosive, as in "The Thracian WVonder," act i., sc. 2 " Think what a corsive it would prove to me." It would be easy to multiply authorities. Page 56, line 26, But we can charm with eourtship. This and the previous part of the speech we must suppose spoken aside; but there is no stage-direction to that efiect. It is not likely that Jupiter would make such open declarations of infidelity to his wife: the same remark will apply to several of J upiter's subsequent speeches, parts of which only were intended to be heard. Page 59, line 22, Enter Danae and Beldam. Neither the exit of the Beldam, to fetch Danae, nor her return with the Princess, are mentioned in the old copy, but the insertion of both is necessary. Page 62, line 23, As I can bear a pack, so I can bear a brain. " To bear a brain" was a proverbial expression. It appears by Henslowe's Diary, p. 155, that Dekker wrote a play in 1599, with the title of " Bear a Brain." Page 63, line 1, Enter the four Beldams. Their two first speeches are heard before they open the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 54 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 113g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236561961
  • 9781236561961