Dr. Pereira's Elements of Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Abridged and Adapted for the Use of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Practitioners and Students and Comprising All of the Medicines of the British Pharmacop Ia, with Such Others as Are

Dr. Pereira's Elements of Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Abridged and Adapted for the Use of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Practitioners and Students and Comprising All of the Medicines of the British Pharmacop Ia, with Such Others as Are

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1872 edition. Excerpt: ...it is not the active principle of mezereon. Acrid Resin.--Obtained by boiling the bark in alcohol. When the solution cools some wax is deposited. The supernatant liquid is to be evaporated, and the residual extract washed with water. The resin then left behind is dark green, and soluble in both alcohol and ether. To this substance mezereon owes its acridity. There is, however, some reason to suspect that this resin is itself a compound of two principles, viz. an acrid vesicating fixed oil, and another substance. The resin is rendered soluble in water by means of the other constituents of the bark. Mr. Squire could not obtain any blistering effect from the resin extracted by' alcohol. Acrid Volatile Oil.--According to Mr. Squire, mezereon contains a volatile acrid substance which is carried off by the vapour of water, but not by the vapour of alcohol. He says, 'the pungent odour given off by boiling mezereon root in water over a lamp is so powerful, that, after holding my head over it for a short time, great irritation was produced, and it was difficult to carry on respiration.' Physiological Effects.--All parts of the true mezereon plant, but more especially the root-bark, are endowed with acridity; in virtue of which they cause irritation and inflammation in tissues to which they are applied. When swallowed, therefore, in large quantities, they prove poisonous. The topical action of mezereon bark is that of an irritant, and, when the bark has been applied to the skin, vesicant. A decoction of mezereon barkr taken in moderate quantities, sometimes appears to promote the action of the secreting and exhaling organs (especially the kidneys and the skin). In larger doses it causes irritation of the alimentary canal and kidneys....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 490 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 25mm | 866g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123692214X
  • 9781236922144